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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can I possibly get assistance to identify information about my step fathers Smith and Wesson revolver?
He is 85 years old and finds it neat that his serial number is 330.
He loves this gun for shooting snakes that are always around his pond.
Also any other small vermin trying to get in his garden.
I would love to be able to give him additional information and facts about it.
It is a 6 shot revolver. 32 caliper, Swing out cylinder, 3 1/2 inch barrel, nickel plated,
Bakelite grip (I think), the number on the butt of the gun is 330.
The number on the frame under the swing cylinder is 444.
Attached are a few pictures.
864F55A6-F15D-4ECF-9AFA-1CD5DFE8C933.jpeg 87F88256-72DC-4E9E-AA19-9AA196C8A565.jpeg
 

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It's the gun that started it all. The S&W 1st model Hand Ejector. Also called the Model of 1896.
Based on the serial number, that is the year your gun was made.
It's in great shape and keep up with the maintenance- it'll still be shooting snakes in the next century too!

The# on the butt is the serial number, the number on the yoke is an assembly number to make sure fitted parts stayed together at the factory.
 

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you just made my evening. I had no idea that it would be that old. My husband is the one that cleans and oils it for him. They don't make them like this anymore. Thanks so much.
You're very welcome. It's a great piece.
 
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Neat little revolver. I have a later version.

The hard rubber, Bakelite stocks are somewhat fragile. They can crack just by dropping them or over-tightening the screw. You might consider a pair of aftermarket stocks and keep the originals safe. Just a thought.

Welcome to the forum, nice way to make an entrance!

Kevin
 

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Welcome to the forum with an excellent family gun. I like the older 32s as they are just plain fun to shoot. As said just keep the Snake Slayer cleaned and will be around several more generations.
 

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The hard rubber grips were not brittle when new - but 100+ years of the volatile compounds slowly leeching out and evaporating takes its toll.

It is my understanding that that "rubber" was what is known as "gutta-percha" - which was also used to make golf balls of the era.

See this article for more info (standard Wiki-warning about unknown accuracy of the info applies):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutta-percha
 
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