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Interesting piece there, it was made before model numbers were issued, which is why you can’t find one. I’m not sure if the number you found is the SN or an assembly number, check the butt of the grip and see if they match. Looks to me like the barrel has been shortened, it should read on the right side “S&W 38 SPL CTG” and have a locking lug for the ejector. It’s also got several marking that I’m not familiar with, you’ll need somebody with a little more knowledge than me to help you on this one.
 

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Looks like a chopped up .38 M&P BSR. Barrel has been cut/shortened. No barrel lug for the extractor rod. Looks to have Brit markings on it (from Birmingham). May well have been a 5" BSR shipped circa April 1942.

I have one that shipped Apr 42, s/n 975xxx. It was modified by the Brits in London.

501285


It was cut down to a 3.5" barrel; still has the barrel lug.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! It looks to be a Cogswell & Harrington conversion of a British Service Revolver that was originally chambered for .38 S&W, not .38 Special. They usually stamped their names on the frame...could be underneath the grips. Likely, the cylinder chambers have been reamed for .38 Special as it was more prevalent a cartridge in the US. The original barrel was 5" and has obviously been shortened and the extractor rod locking lug was cut off leaving the rod exposed. The original grips were originally smooth and were checkered by C&H. The Tyler T grip adapter rounds out the conversion. The gun has very little collector value, but it does have value as a concealed carry belly gun...if it is legal.

There should be a serial number on the butt of the gun somewhere for it to be legal. 935xxx IS a valid SN from late 1941 or early 1942 before the V series serials began. If that number came from the yoke (crane), it is probably an assembly number used during manufacturing. That is not a valid serial number. So, look on the bottom of the butt frame and, if no number, under the grips for a serial that is in the 900K range or starts with a V.
 
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The serial number is on the butt, maybe under the grips. The number you gave is an assembly number. Offhand I would say you have a 38 Military & Police from the WW2 era. The serial number may start with a V. These were typically a 5 inch revolver in 38 S&W, not 38 Special but yours may have been reamed to take 38 Special when they cut the barrel off to make a snubby. The front locking point for the cylinder was on the part of the barrel that was cut off
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! It looks to be a Cogswell & Harrington conversion of a British Service Revolver that was originally chambered for .38 S&W, not .38 Special. They usually stamped their names on the frame...could be underneath the grips. Likely, the cylinder chambers have been reamed for .38 Special as it was more prevalent a cartridge in the US. The original barrel was 5" and has obviously been shortened and the extractor rod locking lug was cut off leaving the rod exposed. The original grips were originally smooth and were checkered by C&H. The Tyler T grip adapter rounds out the conversion. The gun has very little collector value, but it does have value as a concealed carry belly gun...if it is legal.

There should be a serial number on the butt of the gun somewhere for it to be legal. 935xxx IS a valid SN from late 1941 or early 1942 before the V series serials began. If that number came from the yoke (crane), it is probably an assembly number used during manufacturing. That is not a valid serial number. So, look on the bottom of the butt frame and, if no number, under the grips for a serial that is in the 900K range or starts with a V.
The serial number is the same on the bottom of the grips. It has no letters stating it only numbers, 935xxx. But the number inside the crane is 2 two digit numbers.
 

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The serial number is on the butt, maybe under the grips. The number you gave is an assembly number. Offhand I would say you have a 38 Military & Police from the WW2 era. The serial number may start with a V. These were typically a 5 inch revolver in 38 S&W, not 38 Special but yours may have been reamed to take 38 Special when they cut the barrel off to make a snubby. The front locking point for the cylinder was on the part of the barrel that was cut off
The serial number stamped on the bottom of the grip has no letters in it and is the same as stated before , 935xxx
 

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Ok, then. It is a legal handgun in the US. Again, the serial puts it in the 1941/42 time frame. S&W began numbering the serial with a V in April 1942. If you can take a picture of the chambers in the cylinder (put a light shining through the chambers from the front of the cylinder), we can tell if it has been reamed for .38 Special...or you can insert a cartridge to see if it fully inserts into the chamber.
 
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