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480603
number on buttom of grip is 77A on barrel stamped is 32-20 long CTG also guaranteed 1925 "RURAL" model
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! It's not a Smith & Wesson. I'm not sure exactly what it is but it's probably a knock off perhaps made in Spain or Belgium. More and clearer pictures may help someone identify it.

Guy
 

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Easier to say what it is not than what it is: not the work of any major American maker. That unusual cylinder latch should make it easy to identify if a catalog could be found showing an illustration of it. Because it's chambered in the fairly potent .32-20, I'd guess it's pretty well made--in other words, not in the Saturday Night Special class. Can you tell if the grips are genuine mother-of-pearl, not imitation? Which would be another indication of a better quality revolver. A chart identifying foreign proof marks might pin it down.
 

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I see some proof marks on the forward frame and barrel. The one on the barrel appears to be a Spanish mark from Eibar. That is the center of Spanish gunmaking around the turn of last century. My guess, again, is it is Spanish.
 

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It is indeed a gun made in Eibar in the 1920s. As suspected, the unusual latch is the key. I found a couple of examples pictured on the web.

One pictured butt was marked Eibar, 1927, and A.G.H. According to another source on Basque gun makers, that was the workshop of Agustin Gabilondo & Hijos, in operation between 1912 and 1939.


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Maybe made for export to English-speaking countries--the "Rural" marking doesn't sound like Spanish to me.
Most of these were exported to Latin America. Patent infringement issues made them unmarketable in most European and North American countries. But fantasy names in languages other than Spanish, mainly English, but also German and other European languages, were apparently thought to enhance their marketing appeal.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! It's not a Smith & Wesson. I'm not sure exactly what it is but it's probably a knock off perhaps made in Spain or Belgium. More and clearer pictures may help someone identify it.

Guy
480706
WIN_20200907_200840.JPG WIN_20200907_200803.JPG
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 

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Definitely Eibar proofs. The rampant lion is the single and final proof for revolvers. The X proof is admission for guns with old proof marks. The PH means the gun was proofed in 1935 in the middle of the Spanish Civil War. I believe this gun was made by Ojanguren y Vidosa Mkd. "Fab. de Armas Garantazadas" Eibar, Spain. In fact, Numrich has parts for this model.
 
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Surprising that civilian production was still going on at that time, considering the demand for military arms.
The Spanish had an inventory of old weapons and bought or produced anything they could get. .38 and 9mm Corto or Parabellum were used most, but they bought Mosin-Nagant rifles and Nagant revolvers from Russia, Argentine Mausers, French Lebels, Remington rolling blocks and Winchesters. The warring sides would steal each other's arms if they could.
 

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..... The PH means the gun was proofed in 1935 in the middle of the Spanish Civil War. ....
Guy:
I'm not sure about that. The way the PH is stamped, the letters seem to belong together. By themselves, the P would be 1945 and the H 1935, but the combination does not make sense. It's obviously the third part of the triad, with the rampant lion and the crowned shield. I've seen the PV (see example below), but I can't find a PH in any list. Do you have any source showing that combination? My sources also say that the lion was discontinued in 1929, replaced by a P or R inside a bomb shape.


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Yes I got it off a table of Spanish proof dates starting with Alpha and going through Zed. H was 1935. Remember this has a acceptance stamp which probably means that it was retested from an earlier date. I'll look and see if I can find the table again , but I didnt bookmark it.

Guy
 

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The Spanish had an inventory of old weapons and bought or produced anything they could get. .38 and 9mm Corto or Parabellum were used most, but they bought Mosin-Nagant rifles and Nagant revolvers from Russia, Argentine Mausers, French Lebels, Remington rolling blocks and Winchesters. The warring sides would steal each other's arms if they could.
On another forum, there is a photo of Spanish Civil War foreign volunteers armed with Italian Vetterli rifles*.

These found their way to Spain via a number of means, both official and unofficial.


two unusual vetterli pics
1. Russia shipped 13,000 surplus Vetterli mod.1870/87 to Spain for the Republicans in 1937 (as well as 43,00 other types). The Vetterlis were the rifles collected by the Allies and shipped to Russia in 1915 for use on the Romanian front.
2. Italy sent the CTV (Italian Legion) to Spain to join Nationalist forces, including the Frecce Nere brigade who were still equipped with Vetterli mod.70/87 and which were soon replaced by the M91. They also used a small number of Vetterli mod.1870/87/15s.
3. Third source were the Vetterli mod.1870/87/15s gifted to the Nationalists by the Italian Government.

* Model 70: adopted in 1870, 10.4mm centerfire black-powder metallic cartridge using the Swiss Vetterli bolt action - single shot. Both rifle and carbine models.

Model 70/87: model 70 retrofitted starting in 1887 with Vitali 4-round fixed box magazine. Also referred to as the "Vetterli-Vitali". Both rifle and carbine models.

Model 70/87/15: 70/87s with barrel rifling bored out and fitted with an insert liner for the 6.5mm Carcano smokeless-powder cartridge to equip called-up troops in WW1 (1915). The bolt face was also modified for the smaller diameter cartridge base. Both rifle and carbine models.


Just as an aside... I have a model 70/87 Vetterli rifle (barrel is date-stamped 1874) with very good bore... but the stock is cracked on both sides at where it was cut out for the magazine.
 
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