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Hi guys, first post here. I have never owned any gun before this. It was given to my friend, and then given to me. At first I didn't think it was very old because it didn't look like an old revolver because of the finish. Honestly I thought it was just a bad revolver because I've seen newer ones and their style, but I began to research into it and no, apparently this thing is 100+ years old and I think that's just awesome. All of the serial numbers match and the only minor defects it has are some tiny patches of roughness on the finish and what might be rust. Also a bit of the bottom of one grip is chipped off, but its not terrible. Overall I'm finding out that this really is in great condition for its age. The only thing I want to know is how old it really is. The serial as you can tell is 122112. I haven't fired it and the rifling seems to be just fine as well. How the #$%^ did this just walk into my lap? I don't know if I want to sell this thing. I really like it. I can't wait to take it out and give it some food. What do you think? I also want to ask about the action. The double action works fine, although I noticed that when the hammer is cocked back, it can be pushed forward and go off so I think the inner mechanics may be a little worn (I discovered this on accident). The trigger pull seems to be pretty heavy, but for all I know it could be normal seeing as I've never handled any other revolver or handgun for that matter. I'm just happy I have this and I want to know about it and show it off to you folks. :cool:
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*edit* Sorry for the weirdly rotated pictures.
 

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Hi welcome, and I've given your first "like". Many, most (?), all (?), of the older small top-breaks would best be relegated to honorable retirement. The value is usually not too great. There is often a family or other legacy connection that could be honored by preserving them in perhaps a shadowbox display. The thought of someone shooting guns like this why manufacturers load the older cartridges so anemically and sometimes undersized. This is a blackpowder era firearm and maybe an ATF exempt antique (pre-1899).

The .32 DA 4th ran serials 43406 through 282999 during 1883 to 1909. Your numeric calculation would be as good as mine. If it becomes broken, repair will not much of an economic proposition. Think on it...............
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass, Waffles! From the length of the cylinder, I believe your gun is a .38 Double Action, 3rd model, from around 1884. It should chamber .38 S&W (not special) cartridges. It looks so nice because it has been refinished at some point in its life. On an original gun, the trigger guard and barrel latch are blued. Also, the hammer and trigger should be case colored, not plated. The hammer push-off you describe is troubling. It may be because the action needs some serious cleaning. Hopefully, that is all that is necessary. You could soak the gun in solvent overnight then spray brake/carb/parts cleaner into the action to flush out the accumulated gunk. If that doesn't fix the push-off, you may need to open it up so you can get some cleaning tools in there. If cleaning doesn't fix the push-off, you'll need a good gunsmith to work on it. Consider carefully the cost as the gun is worth about $100. Like Waidmann said, maybe a shadow box? Replica grips are available if you want to replace the broken panel.
 
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welcome01to the forum from SE Indiana. I totally agree with Waidman and Wiregrass...it would make a great display piece but not a shooter due to it's hammer issues. You have stumbled onto the best firearms forum on the internet. My only advice would be when acquiring a used firearm that you are not familiar with is to have it checked out by a good gunsmith prior to shooting it.goodidea I've got an old Winchester from 1942 that I'm just itching to shoot sitting at my gunsmith being checked out...SAFETY FIRST. Again Waffles, welcome aboard, pull up a chair and hang out with a bunch of nice folks. Be safe my friends and God bless. Dick.
 

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So I recently got my hands on a smith and wesson .32 DA 4th model and was trying to find a year of manufacturing its serial number is 67xxx
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Can you post some pictures?
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Register it?! Where do you live? The gun was made around 1890, or earlier, and, in the US, is an antique. If you have to have proof, you will have to pay for an historian's letter of authenticity ($100) from the S&W Historical Foundation. Links to the application are sticky posts.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Register it?! Where do you live? The gun was made around 1890, or earlier, and, in the US, is an antique. If you have to have proof, you will have to pay for an historian's letter of authenticity ($100) from the S&W Historical Foundation. Links to the application are sticky posts.
I'm new to indiana and not 100% on there laws yet
 

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I do not know if Indiana is one of the totalitarian states that requires handgun registration. I certainly hope not as most of the country does not since it is unconstitutional. Perhaps one of our Indiana members can comment?
 
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