Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hipnp

Is there a repair book for the Smith & Wesson top break revolvers that anyone has written????

Thanks nugfaong

David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,364 Posts
welcome01 to the forum.

I've not gotten into top-breaks so no help. Like KZero said someone will get you fixed up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I have the serial number 80765, I believe it's a 4th model 32 top break.


pix095557560 (1).jpg

Am I right about the model number 4, maybe I can get a year of manufacturer?

pix026063029_1_kindlephoto-227200078 (1).jpg

These .32S&W revolvers are quite a nifty, robust piece of work, since Smith &Wesson made so many of these their historical value is not much, this one can be restored into a nice personal protection.
I can restore this firearm and make a good shooter when I'm finished with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,364 Posts
I looked in my 3rd edition SCS&W and it said the serial number of the .32 double action 4th Model range was 43406 - 282999. Roughly 239,600 were made c. 1883 -1909. So if you assume equal distribution and equal years of production yours would have been made in late 1885.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I looked in my 3rd edition SCS&W and it said the serial number of the .32 double action 4th Model range was 43406 - 282999. Roughly 239,600 were made c. 1883 -1909. So if you assume equal distribution and equal years of production yours would have been made in late 1885.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So this is what happened....

Bought this firearm on Gunbrokers, cheap as a parts firearm. I've had a few of the S&W top break revolvers through my shop before and I know they are one great firearm, so I purchased this for a fixer upper, I had my guy who restores nickel revolvers ready for this one thinking it needed a new finish, mind you I just assumed that it's a fixer upper, and I was getting ready to start repairs when it arrived. In the past I've had to hunt around for replacement parts, and they can be extremely difficult to locate.

I found this; the screws are pristine no one has cracked the revolver side cover, when I got inside it was filled with goop, hardened oil, a spider or two and no rust. Now the finish is really good for a 140ish firearm with no rust the only thing needed was a good, disassembly, clean the hard goop off and thats it. Having nice screws is really cool, no buggered up screws. Everything needed to be hand cleaned, nothing was looked over, even the hammer spring, trigger spring had to be cleaned, now it's really looking good. 😁

The grips are authentic, original S&W with the serial number on them. They were on really tight. 😁
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Here: received_1219763541543747.jpeg

This is the before photos.

received_494698287753830.jpeg

The hard goop froze the parts.

received_373681583536786.jpeg

Everything was disassembled.

received_543432136397867.jpeg

Even this spring was full of crap.

received_2421654784754811.jpeg

Removing the stuck parts can be difficult, but it can be accomplished without damage to anything, all of the springs are fine, some cleaning and they are ready for another 100 years. 😁
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
After I cleaned everything some of the springs had crud on them and it took some time to get them finished where they function correctly.

received_3102651863084637.jpeg received_386046112074264.jpeg


Cleaned and set.

received_363585364549519.jpeg

I had some ammo that was in storage, that I use on firearm repairs, however it's the long ammo and not the short .32S&W.

received_640695696457671.jpeg

The barrel writing is clear and not worn out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
After completing cleaning the firearm, everything is tight, the timing is excellent, cylinder rotates freely, trigger pull is great, barrel is great, no rust anywhere. The information stamped on the barrel is clear and well preserved. :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,274 Posts
welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! Good job! Check out Gunsmithing Guns of the Old West by David Chicoine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! Good job! Check out Gunsmithing Guns of the Old West by David Chicoine.
nugfaongnugfaong
I have his books for reference with my gunsmithing, there are way too many firearms out there to be knowable on all of them. I use my camera phone to document the takedown.

I'm in the dog house with my wife, after 50 firearms she's not happy with me or them anymore (still loves me tho).:eek:

It's like popcorn, you have to have it all. :)

Every firearm I own, are used, no wall hangers, they are tools for my needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
welcome to the forum! welcome01

Looks like a fine clean up job!
It's nice when the screws are not buggered up. I've seen so many firearm hack jobs it's sad. Everything I work on I personally take the extra time to make 100% sure the screws are clean, fitting is exact, and I take time breaking the screw bond to the firearm.

I have a Remington double barrel shotgun from 1901, every screw is straight along the stock, uniformed, and set by hand.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top