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Hello all, thanks for the add to your forum. Just a 31 year old It tech in the Ft Lauderdale area who enjoys firearms and the history behind them. I actually joined the forum here because I was trying to find some info on a S&W revolver in .32 S&W that was passed on to me by my grandfather. My parents didn't know much about it, and I was trying to find some basic info on when the gun was manufactured and how to potentially restore it. After passing away, my grandfather's belongings were placed in storage and the poor revolver was just placed in a tissue box and forgotten. Its been sitting in storage for almost ten years now. It was only after going through the storage unit recently that my mother came across the revolver and told me my grandfather wanted me to have it. I have included photos of the revolver with the serial number. I have been seeing posts regarding how to trace the serial on your particular firearm - but was a little unclear as to how to correctly identify my grandfathers. Any help with this would be appreciated, even though .32 isn't the most popular round, I would love to find a way to clean my grandfather's up a bit and perhaps find a nice way to display it.

*NOTE: I do realize my finger is touching the trigger a bit in the photo, but its a bit small in the hand and was awkward taking the photo. I did open the cylinder and check the chamber before taking the photo.


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Looks like a very early S&W hand ejector in .32 sn 180366 would be before they started heat treating the cylinders:

1920: .22/32 & .32 by c. #321000

So.... use extreme care when firing this, and no +P or hot loads if you do shoot it.

I don't have my copy of the Standard Catalog of Smith and Wesson with me, but I'd expect this one dates somewhere circa 1910...

It would be worth carefully removing the grips and checking to see if there is a factory "N" mark indicated it was factory nickle plated.
 

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Sep/ Oct 1911.
 

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...and welcome01 to the forum.
 

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Welcome from the Texas Panhandle.
 

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Welcome to the forum!:)
 

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Mine's of similar age. Regular commercial .32s are just fine in it.

 
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