Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is just a general question for people with experience in this field. I love guns and I’d like to make a living doing something with them, if I could make as much behind the counter of a store as I do in my current construction job I’d just do that. But gunsmithing not only piques my interest and is a skill I’d love to know anyway but has the potential to make decent money. I’m 31 so I have time to learn. But I’d like to hear from people in the know and have first hand experience. Any thoughts are welcome thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,137 Posts
I spoke with a former roofer, now gunsmith in FL he never looked back.. and he’s real good..

Thewelshm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
Yes and No. To make money as a gun smith takes lots of capitol. The tools , sight movers, lathes mills and other special equipment all cost money. If you go to some one in the Gun Smithing Guild you have be an apprentice - ship and work under a Master. There are only so many Great Gun Smiths. If you can get hired as an Armorer for a large PD great your a civil servant. But just taking the classes and passing the courses does not a gun smith make . You have to prove yourself in the field. I was a Dept Armorer and have been to schools from Smith Wesson Sig Colt Mossberg Bennelli H&K etc. I had the honor to learn at the hand of Mr Harry McGowen a great gun smith from years ago. But with all that you still never get rich. The worst part is the new polymer guns are just drop in new parts. The old guns there are no parts. So you end up having to make parts and that takes alot of time and cost more than people want to pay. It will all depend on your commitment and your determination to stick it out ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
At 31 yrs old, I'd look into gunsmithing online, see what it's about. If you like guns and like to tinker with stuff, go for it. I think more people shoot today. Turn a dream into reality. 💡
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,493 Posts
My gunsmith friend has been gunsmith for 20 years now. He also has gun, ammo, archery, and general outdoor store with a range. about 40% of his work is repairing guns and other 60% is cleaning (deep as people just do not want to do it), sighting in, changing sights, and installing scopes.
He said worked around with other gun stores in beginning and work with them on guns they bring in and customer repair work. Or as Layne said an armorer for an LEO dept or range.
He has all his equipment is used and was picked up in auctions or salvage. He has partnered with some machine shops to use their special lathes or mills when needed. Good luck with your journey can be very rewarding in other ways even if won't get rich.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,528 Posts
Layne12gun nailed it. The gunsmith here builds AR15's, Tac shotguns but doesn't know revolvers real well. Saying that he did fix to older S&W's for me while i watched and I told him about reversed threads on the extractor which I didn't think he knew about. The other one had hammer push off because the home gunsmith (bubba) try to lighten the trigger pull. He was able to fix that problem with a file to the hammer. There not another gunsmith in my area that I know about so I use him and he is reasonable price wise also he owns a gun shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I appreciate everybody’s feed back. I had some experience with a gun smith awhile back with my pre 27. The guy I would’ve preferred was closed because of the virus/remodeling. So I took it to a younger guy. I have no doubt he can build a great AR and can do impeccable cerakote but he was a little lost with the pre 27 and I ended up paying him for a little work that didn’t fix it and fixing it myself. That’s kind of what started turning my wheels on the whole thing. I know the machinery can be expensive and online learning will only take you so far and then your best bet is to get hired on by someone who knows what’s what. A lot of these younger guys they don’t do what the older gentleman do or know what they know and I think it’s knowledge worth learning. The S&W revolvers and 1911s I think are going to stay popular guns for a long time and less people are learning to work on them.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top