Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Many years ago, after graduating from high school (1973), I thought I'd see some of this country since I hadn't traveled much up to that point. A friend of mine was in the air force and stationed down south so I thought that was as good a reason to go there as any. Having grown up in the upper Midwest I was more than intrigued when I ended up staying in a boarding house in Selma, Alabama for $15 per week. Without a doubt I knew I was in new country.

Being too poor at the time to afford the weekly meal plan at the boarding house I went across the street to see what I might scrounge up for breakfast at the local cafe. Joining me was my new boarding house roommate, Shawn, and this is where Boss Hogg comes in. Do you remember the TV show "Dukes of Hazzard" that had the Boss Hogg character in it? Well Shawn was a 22 year old version of Boss Hogg. Loud, obnoxious, annoying, and about 5'3" tall AND wide, but he was my roommate so we went to the cafe together.

We're sitting at the table and Shawn says (now use your strongest southern accent), "Well Dennis, what are you going to have?". Not being from around there and not knowing what was customary in those parts I said (now use your strongest flat Midwest accent), "I don't know, Shawn, what are you going to have?". Shawn said he was going to have some grits and I, being from the upper Midwest like I said, had no idea what grits were as I grew up eating Cream-of-Wheat. So I calmly asked Shawn what grits were ... bad question to ask.

Now remember, Shawn is the younger incarnation of Boss Hogg and he is loud and large. Shawn proceeds to stand up on the table and yells out to the whole cafe, while pointing at me, "Hey, this guy don't know what grits is!". Yes I was embarrassed and got him to come down from on top of the table only if I agreed to try grits. I can't say I cared for how they ate grits locally, with butter and pepper, but I can eat them just fine with milk and sugar - just like Cream-of-Wheat!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Just for clarification, this Wisconsin Yankee (been in Georgia since February 1989 and ain't leavin') describes grits as "Fresh boiled sand." I didn't like them in the air force, Huddle House, my wife's, my mother -in-law's, my son-in-law's, or my daughter's.

Top of inedible food list is 1] fried liver and onions, 2] grits, 3] boiled greens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,114 Posts
Hey 1911,

Trade ya. I'll take yer grits...ya'll kin have all the blame shrooms...

If'n I was a wantin' funguses...i'd a pick betwixt my fool toes....

Later, Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,114 Posts
Hey Ike,

Got turned on to grits in the late 70's....

Black Gentleman owned a diner en route to work....He was open all night...

Eggs, Bacon & Grits...Butter, salt & pepper... The "bomb" for me...

Sadly, he is gone.....no place near where I live that has GOOD GRITS/HOMINY like that Gentleman made!

As long as I worked that job, and even other jobs any where near him, I'd get up early for BREAKFAST there!!

Later, Mark
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ike1518

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,758 Posts
In 1977 I was attending Navy Aviation Electronics school in Millington TN. and the locals made it known that unless you were one of them, you might as well be from a foreign nation. During my first week there, eating dinner in the chow hall, I blindly got a tray while standing in line, not even reading the menu posted at the entrance, which really didn't matter, I'd pretty much have to eat what they served because options were limited. Hey though, Fried Chicken, YES, I can easily do that! So I allow my tray to be filled and find a table of strangers, not having made any buddies just yet because early on it's a transitional existence until you've cleared through all the preliminary schools. As to the tasty looking and great smelling food, I get down to business, starting with a bite of mashed potatoes covered with white gravy, some greens (turnip or mustard), which I really love and I started pulling apart the first of my 3 pieces of chicken, hmm? The first thought that came to my mind was; "Man, they sure do cut up their chicken different here in Tennessee." The breading was pretty normal, but the actual meat tasted different from my mom and grandma's fried chicken for sure. I asked one of the guys at my table if their chicken was weird and in return I got 3 sets of eyes staring at me, finally one of them said; "This ain't chicken boy, this is rabbit." Holy crap, I didn't realize it because even though I'd had rabbit many times, it had always been grilled outside and once in a stew, but never fried! Mystery solved and because I knew what I had, I ate it up with gusto! Going forward I paid attention to the week's menu that was posted in our living quarters and whenever fried rabbit was to be served, I was there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In 1977 I was attending Navy Aviation Electronics school in Millington TN. and the locals made it known that unless you were one of them, you might as well be from a foreign nation. During my first week there, eating dinner in the chow hall, I blindly got a tray while standing in line, not even reading the menu posted at the entrance, which really didn't matter, I'd pretty much have to eat what they served because options were limited. Hey though, Fried Chicken, YES, I can easily do that! So I allow my tray to be filled and find a table of strangers, not having made any buddies just yet because early on it's a transitional existence until you've cleared through all the preliminary schools. As to the tasty looking and great smelling food, I get down to business, starting with a bite of mashed potatoes covered with white gravy, some greens (turnip or mustard), which I really love and I started pulling apart the first of my 3 pieces of chicken, hmm? The first thought that came to my mind was; "Man, they sure do cut up their chicken different here in Tennessee." The breading was pretty normal, but the actual meat tasted different from my mom and grandma's fried chicken for sure. I asked one of the guys at my table if their chicken was weird and in return I got 3 sets of eyes staring at me, finally one of them said; "This ain't chicken boy, this is rabbit." Holy crap, I didn't realize it because even though I'd had rabbit many times, it had always been grilled outside and once in a stew, but never fried! Mystery solved and because I knew what I had, I ate it up with gusto! Going forward I paid attention to the week's menu that was posted in our living quarters and whenever fried rabbit was to be served, I was there!
Blackcloud2,
Great story -thanks for sharing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,128 Posts
Just for clarification, this Wisconsin Yankee (been in Georgia since February 1989 and ain't leavin') describes grits as "Fresh boiled sand." I didn't like them in the air force, Huddle House, my wife's, my mother -in-law's, my son-in-law's, or my daughter's.

Top of inedible food list is 1] fried liver and onions, 2] grits, 3] boiled greens.
You need to get your butt to Charleston and have some shrimp and grits with some cheddar cheese
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ike1518
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top