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Swapped a friend out of his Dillon Digital scale. Been playing around with it this weekend. Have to say that I checked it against my RCBS regular scale. The two matched closely.

So today I wanted to do some load development work with a couple of different powders at differend loadings. The little digital made quick work of that. And I like the numeric display. It is very sensitive to just a few grains of powder. It's small compact size uses less bench space (that is at a premium) sooo...Guess it's a keeper... ;)

giz
 

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Giz,
When I first got mine I kept checking it against my RCBS mechanical scale. The digital is always right on.. And, it's sooo much faster.

You're gonna love it!
 

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I had trouble switching from an old Simpson meter to the Fluke digital. Old dog, new trick thing. Flukes rule in my book now. It took me about five minutes to decide. Should have gone to a digital powder scale long ago, but,
 

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I just started using a digital about a year ago (RCBS). I also found that I was comparing it to the old one all the time.

Even now, I still throw one of the calibration weights on there to make sure it's right on.

'Course I still double check my digital calipers with my old set of dial calipers every time I measure somthing. I still can't get myself to trust this whole electronic thing too much. ;)
 

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Now that I think about it, I guess I'm just used to using digital measuring equipment. I've used digital tools and meters for years (decades, really) in my profession with almost zero problems.

One thing I've learned is that a digital tool isn't off a little.. it's either correct, or it's off so much as to grab your attention fast!

However, when it comes to reloading, I too still use check weights when starting a reloading session. Can't be too safe..
 

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When I first started using my digital scale, I used to recalibrate it after every 5 rounds. It took me hours to get 100 rounds loaded. :lol:

I finally realized that I could just throw a weight on there and see what it said. I'm certainly not the coldest beer in the fridge. :lol:
 

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I use the digital to check bullet weights, brass variation within a lot, and overall cartridge weight as well.
It's so much easier than waiting for the balance beam to exactly center.
The accuracy, as Carl pointed out, is either right or not.
Love it!
Don
;)
 
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I honestly believe that it is a great tool for load developement. As mentioned above ~ it makes fast work of checking brass and bullet weights. It's nice not to have to reset everything (as with the beam scale) if you just want to move from one project to the next. Set mine up between the two Dillons and I can now quickly check my powder dispensers to say if they are staying true.

See, you can teach an old dog a new trick... :mrgreen:

giz
 

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If I remember correctly this is one product by Dillon not covered under their lifetime no BS warranty. I believe the digital scale is only under warranty for a limited time period.
 

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I've used my Midway scale for a couple of years, and I bought it used. So, hard to say how old it is.

One thing about digital stuff, they don't 'wear out'. If something goes wrong, it's time to get a new one. But, they usually last a long time before something goes wrong.
 

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I have one of the Midway digital scales, but I use the balance beam just as often. I waste a lot of time re-checking it.

Last week, I went to the post office to mail off a package that weighed ~1 pound. When the postage came up unusually expensive, I noted that the digital scale said it weighed nearly 5 pounds. It kept registering the exact same - but incorrect weight, so I never could get the dope behind the counter to believe that her foolproof scale was off, so I left and mailed it from another post office down the road.

xtm
 

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I hesitate to post this, but you don't need to keep using your balance beam scale to double check the digital scale.

All you need is something to use as a check weight. (I actually have a set of check weights, but anything will work.)

Once you determine the exact weight of your check weight, you don't need the balance beam anymore. Just use the check weight to make sure your digital scale is reading correctly.

One note of caution.. whatever you use for a check weight must be kept in very good shape, and kept clean. Otherwise, it's not going to be accurate.

This sounds kinda stupid-simple, but it's a sound technique. As long as your scale is reading correctly using a check weight, your loads will be correct too.

If a digital scale is incorrect, it's usually off by a lot and you'll notice something is wrong.

Just as the post office scale was way off...

This is how I do it, and I've never had a problem. However, if it makes you nervous, just don't do it this way...
 

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Carl,
You make an excellent point.
I exchanged my first digital scale for a replacement.
The first one consistently weighed heavy, by 22 gr.!
The circuitry wasn't correct.
Always check the scale againse a known quantity or test-weight.
Don
;)
 

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I converted to Dillon's electronic scale about a century ago...

well....whenever it came out in the 90s.....

Took all of a picosecond to decide I'd rather us IT than the old bobblybalancebeam....

never a problem, works fine at LEAST these past 10 years....

if I leave the door open to my reloading chamber 'sometimes' the wind will affect it's reading.....so I close the door....
 
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