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Discussion Starter #1
Tirez le fusil!
[url="http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s194/slashcat/fusilboucanier009.jpg"]http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s194 ... ier009.jpg[/url]Quois?
Just got this neat-o French Marine (circa 1690) Musket replica from Track of the Wolf! 73 caliber smoothbore. Ain't history grand? Beats the hell out of the 21st century (except for modern medicine,computers,running water,etc.)
 
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Fusil Boucanier....even sounds as good as it looks!

Can't wait to shoot it with you... :D I've thought this was the Summer of the Rimfire...
But I think your onto something there...What could possibly be more fun then taking out some real history and enjoying the hell out of it :mrgreen:

giz
 

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Very nice Marquis Barrefelin
 
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LordSlash...

Details man! You cannot just post a pic of a beautiful gun, without giving out a few tidbits of the guns place in the history of Black Powder....or relationship to it's time period :)

giz
 

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Those eyeball magnifiers you're wearin' detract from the overall effect. What you need is an eyepatch and a parrot. Preferably a dead parrot. Maybe a red sash and a cutlass.

Great gun! I visit Track of the Wolf occasionally. Neat place, nice stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The gun was made by John Bosh from parts obtained from The Rifle Shoppe. The lock was reverse engineered from wax castings of an original. The barrel is 47 inches and 73 cal. by Colerain. The history lesson is as follows:
The Buccaneer muskets were the weapons that actually put "Tulle" in business. In the 1693 inventory they had enough locks on hand to build 4650 Buccaneers. St. Etienne made them prior to tulle and starting in 1683 french ships were required by law to have at least 12 on board and to be sold to the colonies they went to. Then, by 1714, many colonies required each household to have 1 buccaneer with powder, ball, sword or bayonet, and if they were slaveowners, they had to provide their slaves with one as well. This law was in effect until the 1740’s. Because of their barrel lengths and the slower burning powders at the time, they were said to have much greater range. There were still 660 in the Quebec inventories in 1752. Barrel lengths range from 46" to 60" with 52" to 54" being the most common lengths. The standard caliber was .69 minimum, and .73 being the maximum. Some were even ordered cut back so they could be used with a socket bayonet. They were made with brass or steel mounts depending on the climate they were going to. Most of the ones going to Louisiana and Mississippi territories were brass mounted. Lewis Leonard has found the records from some American expeditions in Georgia and the Carolinas where they purchased quantities of these weapons to take with them. There are also drawings from the 1600’s of Iriquois Indians carrying them. The Americans captured many of these and they were used up into the Revolutionary War. If you study the Hudson Valley Fowlers they take most of their styling from these guns. A 46" barrel in .69 caliber is available from Getz or Colerain. For longer length barrels, contact Ben Coogle who will make them 54" to 60".
 
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