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Hello fellow gun enthusiasts! My name is Dean Charron and I am the son of Dwayne W. Charron, former head of R&D at S&W from the early 1960s and 70s. In 2012, my father and I wrote a book called, "My Life Journey with Smith & Wesson." My father is the designer of many notable S&W guns such as the Model 52, Model 76 SMG, Model 61 Escort and the "Hush Puppy" suppressor, to name a few.

My Dad passed away in January 2019 at the age of 93. In memory of my father, I transcribed his book into an e-book format and I am making it available to interested readers free of charge. Please share the book freely. The book can be viewed and/or downloaded in PDF format at the following link:

My Life Journey with Smith & Wesson | AnyFlip

I hope you enjoy the story of his amazing journey and I welcome and will respond to all comments. Best, Dean W. Charron (Son)

Bonus Information: As promised, I am adding some additional information about my father and his contributions to the gun world. The following is not in his book for obvious reasons:
I thought those here on the thread would be interested in knowing some things about my father that are not in his book.

In the late 1970s, my father was approached by Paul Romano from New York. Romano ran a company that produced replica kits of old cap and ball pistols. His company was flooded with orders but could only produce a few guns a day. My father was tapped to take over the company as President and as what we would call the "Chief Operating Officer" of the company. My father said he would accept on one condition: That the company be moved to Massachusetts. Romano agreed and Classic Arms was moved to the Mapletree Industrial Park in Palmer soon after.

Under my father's management, the company was soon producing about 400 to 600 guns a day--up from about 12 a day. They also opened a sister company in the same factory making belt buckles with a gun-oriented theme--my father was in charge of that too. If you want to read more about this little-known piece of history, go here:
https://www.si.com/vault/1977/05/23/621771/collectors-are-getting-a-bang-out-of-inexpensive-antique-firearm-kits

My Dad also consulted for Dan Wesson Firearms and was integral in correcting the issues they were having with their .357 interchangeable barrel pistol. For obvious reasons, these ventures are not mentioned in his book.

Just a side note: My Dad was an avid golfer and he was good, I mean really good! He was also an avid and accomplished bowler. Being a die-hard engineer, just about everything in our house had been modified to work better in some way. In his later years, he took up the organ and oil painting--both of which he excelled at.

Best,

Dean W. Charron
 

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I bought a signed copy of the book years ago... very cool that it's being made available like this as an e-book, a fitting tribute to your Father, I was saddened to learn of his death on the S&WCA forum.
 

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Hi Dean, and welcome to the forum. I hope you can spend some time with us here. We're all enthusiasts for the kind of things your father invested his life in.

I recently completed work editing a book about Mauser, so have a great appreciation for history as it applies to the firearms industry. Your contribution is appreciated. Thanks, Marc
 

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Hi Dean, and welcome to the forum. I hope you can spend some time with us here. We're all enthusiasts for the kind of things your father invested his life in.

I recently completed work editing a book about Mauser, so have a great appreciation for history as it applies to the firearms industry. Your contribution is appreciated. Thanks, Marc
Thank you for your comment. I plan to post some other little known information about my father here soon. He was sharp as a tack right to the end and passed peacefully, simply from old age...

Best,

Dean
 

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I thought it was the best thing I could do to honor his many achievements. Besides being a talented designer, he was above all a great father--he was there for me every step of the way and I miss him every day. Thank you for your kind comments. Best, Dean
 

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Marc, Thank you for your comments. I can appreciate the hard work you most likely put into your book. The scant number of pages my Dad and I produced took endless hours of writing and re-writing; plus, transposing the book to e-book took almost a month. I have a feeling they will be talking about his work 100 years from now! Best, Dean
 

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Hey Dean,

Welcome to :bluelogo:

Later, Mark
 

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Downloaded and read it tonight. You dad was obviously a very smart and talented man. Its really cool that you got to visit the plant with your dad. If only you could remember everything you saw & experienced there. Did you ever see how the guns were blued? There seems to be a lot a question about the S&W process
The way it's written, I would say your dad was humble. He had a great career and did some pretty cool stuff much of what had to be quite challenging and he makes it sound like not such a big deal. Stuff like "They needed a machine to do this so I made them one" (paraphrased). Lot of chance there the explain difficulties and "how great I was to over come them", but you dad truly sounds like it wasn't a big deal, anyone could of done it, when truly he sounds like a bit of a genius
Thanks for sharing this story with us
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I thought you might enjoy this information about my father; it is not in his book for obvious reasons.


In the late 1970s, my father was approached by Paul Romano from New York. Romano ran a company that produced replica kits of old cap and ball pistols. His company was flooded with orders but could only produce a few guns a day. My father was tapped to take over the company as President and as what we would call the "Chief Operating Officer" of the company. My father said he would accept on one condition: That the company be moved to Massachusetts. Romano agreed and Classic Arms was moved to the Mapletree Industrial Park in Palmer soon after.

Under my father's management, the company was soon producing about 400 to 600 guns a day--up from about 12 a day. They also opened a sister company in the same factory making belt buckles with a gun-oriented theme--my father was in charge of that too. If you want to read more about this little-known piece of history, go here:
https://www.si.com/vault/1977/05/23/621771/collectors-are-getting-a-bang-out-of-inexpensive-antique-firearm-kits

My Dad also consulted for Dan Wesson Firearms and was integral in correcting the issues they were having with their .357 interchangeable barrel pistol. For obvious reasons, these ventures are not mentioned in his book.

Just a side note: My Dad was an avid golfer and he was good, I mean really good! He was also an avid and accomplished bowler. Being a die-hard engineer, just about everything in our house had been modified to work better in some way. In his later years, he took up the organ and oil painting--both of which he excelled at.

Best,

Dean W. Charron
 

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I got the download off the Blue Forum and can highly recommend it.
When I clicked on the link, I did not see a "download" anywhere. What am I missing? Would love to download it and read it later
 
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