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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm new to the S&W lifestyle...previous Ruger die-hard (not sure why, however).

Anyhow, I'm looking to add a S&W for home protection (also some carry in the wintertime).

Considering a used Police trade in Model 10 in .38Spl, and also a new 686 in .357Mag.

Have many other .38s and .357s, so caliber isn't really the issue...wondering between the 2 which you would buy. The Model 10 is $400 and the new 686 is about $680. I can do a lot with the $280 difference between them, but looking for other thoughts and opinions.

I admit this post is somewhat vague, probably because it's late, but I wanna make the purchase tomorrow and don't know yet what my decision is - hoping for your help!

Thanks much.
Andy
 

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I got into stainless guns a few years ago just because the finish on them is a bit more durable than blue. However, I really don’t believe you can go wrong with either. The 686 is my choice. Good luck and let us know what you decide.
 

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Definitely the 686. You can always get another model 10 at a later date. Good luck and keep us up to date regarding your decision. Oh...and welcome to the forum!:)
 

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I agree will all the above responses, 686....
 

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make mine 45 acp 😎
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even in a snub, a 686 is a little heavy/big to carry.. people do, but then some folks carry n frames also..

a 686 is a great gun for home protection and for range work, holstered for outdoors,etc..
a 3" / 4" 686 would be an excellent choice for overall useage outside of a carry gun.

you dont mention the barrel length you are thinking about ? Some find the 6" L frames to be nose heavy..
i've traded out of all my 686's except for a 5" plus model which i find very well balanced and execptionally suited for the range and outdoors.

a 686 is also adjustable sighted compared to the m10 fixed sight, makes it a much better range gun..
also new models com predrilled for a mount if an optic is somehing of interest.

and then there is the 357 :cool: vs 38

on the down side of a new 686 - they come with the locking hole, mim parts, frame firing pin, etc..
i dont have an issue with those (my one 686 has them all), but many do.

you also have to be sure that you inspect the gun fully before you accept it - especially for canted barrels , rough tooling, poorly finished bits.
Thats not limited to Smith, all the manufacturers are lighter on the quality control than they used to be.
Certainly not every gun has issues mut ive seen enough complaints ouver the past few years that id be particularly meticulous on inspection..
 

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I see a lot of good looking functional Model 10's going $300-$500. Buddy was just by with a round butt beauty he scored for $300.

I like to shot stout rounds for the most part so the 686 would maybe probably be my choice but I often carry a little airweight with underwood 38 special LSWC and dont feel under gunned. If its a carry .. the 10 is a little lighter, a touch faster in the handling and if I could score a short barrel .. and save couple of hundred ... yea a model 10 looks pretty attractive.
 

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If money is an issue, shop around a bit. The S&W K Frame revolvers continue to be surplus from a number of police agencies worldwide. I have one that came back from Victoria Australia bought from Buds a few years ago for $245 - and in great mechanical condition (with some holster wear). Model 64 and 66 revolvers (stainless K frame) are coming up for sale too.

I would only buy a used revolver that you can actually inspect yourself, or from someone that will accept the return without problem if something isn't right.

Some of these older S&W revolvers, properly maintained and not abused, are actually better than current manufacture where quality control can vary, and the internal lock offends many of us. My new 686 from a few years ago arrived with a slightly canted barrel.

If it's for a bedroom home defense firearm, you really don't want the power of a .357 magnum (which will over penetrate any wall in a modern home).

Welcome to the forum!
 

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First off, welcome to the forum.

I would go with the Model 10 for home protection given the choice you pose.

My home protection you ask? I use a Ruger SR1911 9mm for that.

photo host link
 

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Welcome aboard! I am new to this board as well, with only a week or so under my belt.
That said, I am not new to S&W revolvers...
Both guns you mentioned are great guns, but are really built for two different purposes. The Model 10 with fixed sights, for is more for service use. Millions of these guns have served the Military and Police well for a century. With no sights to get damaged or moved while in a scuffle with a bad guy, they are a perfect choice. I have shot 4 or 5 of these, and they have all shoot point of aim, or pretty close to it.

The 686 on the other hand, is a whole different cat. With it's adjustable sights, and heavier frame, it is a real work horse, and able to better stand up to extended use of heavy loads. This is a way better target or range gun, and the two that I have shoot both shoot really well. Mine has a 6 inch barrel, and my brother has the 4 inch, and there is not a whole lot of difference in the way they shoot. I personally like a little little more barrel, and the extra length and weight of the L frame, and 6 inch barrel, does soak up the recoil a bit better. Down side is they are heavy, to carry and hard to conceal, so for most not a practical carry gun.

Try and find some one, who has one of each, and will let you go to the range and play. Most guys are happy to share the hobby, and eager to help.
One word of warning... S&W revolvers are very addictive, and its hard to have just one. Its a slippery slope, and its easy to slide down!
Lots of luck, and happy shooting!
BES
 

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If it's for a bedroom home defense firearm, you really don't want the power of a .357 magnum (which will over penetrate any wall in a modern home)
When My 686 or Gp is on the night stand I would switch to 38+p mostly because of thereduced sound and muzzle blast over my outdoor carry 357 ammo. I dont worry much about over penetration as it would have to get through the bad guys body first to make it through a wall but sound and flash are a real issue.

Now .. to the OP ..


a little high on the budget but this works quite well .. I did see one with a 3 inch barrel .. dont know if that was a home brew but I would prefer a 3"-3.5 over a 4 for carry but .. the 2" will do just fine

 

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Discussion Starter #18
First off, thanks to everyone for the replies!!! I got exactly the sort of info I was looking for.

In regards to barrel length. I'm partial to a 4" length.

Right now I'm leaning towards the Model 10 simply because of cost. As I think I said originally, there's a lot I can do with the extra $280 bucks.

Going to look at them (again) both in a bit, and I'll let ya know my decision.
I truly appreciate the opinions of each of you!
Andy
 

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The model 10 is, in my experience, built as solid as a hockey puck. I used one for IPSC 30 odd years ago and broke all the rules to get a major power factor. After 10 years of abuse I was getting some serious flame cutting of the top strap, But no loss of timing or forcing cone gap. Kept it for a truck gun (any West Texas type knows what that means) and only ever had one malfunction when I didn’t get the cylinder screwed back in tight. Only gave it up when an acquaintance offered me an obscenely high price for it when I was mostly broke. If I could have only one pistol, it would be a model 10!
 

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If you're serious about the used Model 10, look on Gunbroker for completed sales of similar revolvers. This will give you an idea of what they are actually selling for in the marketplace. There should not be much reason to go above those prices. Remember, dealers have to make money - but revolvers don't sell like Semi-Auto pistols (there is considerably less demand). I don't become emotionally invested in one until after I've negotiated a price and bought it. Let the salesman talk about how beautiful it is, and don't criticize it - just tell him what it's worth to you. There is always another shop and another Model 10.

This is used. If everything isn't perfect, be sure to allow for possible expense making it right.
 
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