Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen,

Thank you so much for your time. I have a S&W .38 Special revolver that has been in my family for quite some time. To my knowledge, it originally belonged to one of my late uncle's, this one passed away in 1971 due to a rollover car accident. My Grandfather gave it to me 20+ years ago, unfortunately he has been gone for many years as well.

I was comparing this with a few pictures on the internet but I still don't know for sure. There is no model# anywhere on it, the serial# is 220863.

If anyone can tell me the model and year of manufacture, I would really appreciate it. Someday one of my boys will inherit it and I'd like them to know what it is along with where it came from.

Thank you,
John
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
12,061 Posts
Hey 406,

Welcome to S&W!

Way to go! Pics of a fine FAMILY HEIRLOOM, right out the gate....

Some of the experts will be along in a bit.

I'm guessing that is an M&P...?? Looks to be in excellent condition...

Later, Mark
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,326 Posts
Nope, that's the original "inky" finish. from pre WW I Smiths.
Gorgeous M&P. I'd put a 1914-15 date on it too.

They generally shoot better with non-jacketed (lead) ammo
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41,821 Posts
Hi and welcome to the forum. Great looking revolver. Hope you take it out for some exercise once in a while.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
23,154 Posts
Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! As K22 and others have stated, your inheritance is a .38 Military & Police revolver, Model 1905, 3rd Change. If you remove the grips (don't pry), the serial number should be written in pencil on the back of the right panel. After 107 years, it may be faded and difficult to see. Serial numbers will also be found under the barrel, on the breech face of the cylinder, on the back of the extractor star and on the back of the yoke arm (look through cylinder chambers to see). All these numbers should match because there is no reason to believe your gun isn't in its original configuration. The .38 M&P revolver is S&W's bread and butter gun since 1899 and they have made around 7 million of them in essentially the same configuration as your gun. It appears to be in excellent condition. Congratulations on your inheritance!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Fascinating, thank you Gentlemen for your time and insight. I obviously guessed very badly on the age, I was guessing post WW II, not pre WW I. I doubt it's been fired in my lifetime (I'm 50) as I've kept it as more of a heirloom. I will take it out sooner than later and let it shoot again with my boys. I think I have some target rounds that are not too hot for it.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,431 Posts
Get some 158 grain lead rounds for it and you will have an enjoyable day at the range.

18 rounds at 7 yards. At the time of this range outing the revolver was 103 years old and the shooter was 72. I walked them in from the right. :)

498279
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
23,154 Posts
Johnny, the only caveat I'll offer...and it is a minor one...is your model M&P is lacking a hammer block safety. S&W didn't implement the sideplate mounted hammer block until about 20,000 guns after yours was made when they brought out the 4th Change version. That hammer block is an ENHANCEMENT to the hammer blocking feature of the rebound slide. Basically what these two safeties do is mitigate the potential for an unintended discharge when a cartridge is under the hammer and the gun is dropped or something strikes the hammer with force. Even with these two safeties, a Victory M&P was dropped several decks onboard a ship during WWII, discharged and killed a sailor. This event resulted in S&W implementing the hammer block safety now found on all its revolvers. All I'm saying is any gun should be handled with care when loaded. And the early M&Ps should receive heightened awareness when a cartridge is under the hammer.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
23,154 Posts
Speaking of cartridges, K22 recommends 158 grain lead round nose (LRN). That is the cartridge the fixed sights on the M&P are regulated for with a 6 o'clock hold at 25 yards. A 6 o'clock hold is when the front sight is placed at the bottom of the bullseye when level in the notch of the rear sight. Powder load and bullet weight affect the point of impact. Modern target ammo is weaker than the .38 Special when your gun was made. +P ammo is more akin to the original .38 Special loading. So, your POI will shift with distance from target, bullet weight and powder load. So, don't blame the sights if you don't hit where you aim. :D
 

· Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
Congratulations and yes, share that piece of history with your boys.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top