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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some advice from the experienced members.
I only have a small collection of firearms and none to my knowledge are collector items.
I have bought what I liked and nothing more.
My question is what is the relevance of knowing the date the firearm is made??
It seems like all of the new members first post is to ask what the born on date is on modern firearms.
Am I missing some pertinent info.
Please be kind, I'm tying to learn why.
 

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If you're collecting them, knowing the date has some relevance as there were changes (sort of a "collect the set" kind of thing). Usually it's the first step in deciding whether to pop for a "letter". If you're just buying what you like, probably not.

e.g: I asked for the ship date on this one, because it has an anomalously low S/N



Turns out it was shipped two years before the next earliest known RPT. Cool Petes! :D

I find it kind of odd when people ask for ship dates on guns with alpha serials. C'mon guys, it's a recent gun.
 

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While I'm often curious to know the age of a firearm, the truth is that (except for design and manufacturing changes) it really doesn't make much difference.

Military firearms like Lugers were marked with dates to indicate their age in service and help isolate their repeating military serial number scheme. For example, you can have several Lugers or P.38 pistols with the same serial number - the date and other characteristics being the only difference in identifying them.

American firearms are generally made with unique serial numbers, and while manufacture is batched you can get an approximate idea of when they were made and shipped.

The only other date related issue here is the Antique and Curio and Relic designation in American law. After 50 years, a Firearm qualifies for transfer under C&R license meaning 1969 and earlier manufactured guns are considered C&R.

Marc
 

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Date and model dash number get people excited. They are both related
Then or course there is the NO dash which is the cats meow.
so a M 60 no dash is way more betterer than a M 60-1;)
 

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Some -1's are more valuable than no dashes. 29-1 comes to mind. Also a 36-6 will be more valuable than other mod 36's because they made less of them.
 

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Characteristics e.g. pinned/recessed, hardened cylinder, military or police markings, MIM parts, Internal Lock, number of screws, have greater bearing on value that an arbitrary date. I suppose age and value are the initial questions provoked by curiousity. Unfortunately all too often the old is common, suffers from age and lacks the value hoped for.
 

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I like looking up the date of manufacture while I am looking for other bits of history on the gun. I have a few that are my Birth year. Also some over 100 years old but still can out shoot me. I do intend on passing them on to my Grandkids. I am teaching them about their ages and history.
 

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Based on some of the old farts I shoot with, prefer the earlier S&Ws because of better fit and finish. Some guys won't buy a S&W revolver made after 1978. I have a couple of newer models, but i do prefer the older ones. Also, if you find a really nice revolver and then find out it was made in 1960, you know it has been taken care of, a cream puff.
 

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I feel that the date is an interesting piece of knowledge and have most of mine dated as to the month it left the factory. I have one that Roy Jinks said was made in one year and did not leave the factory for close to six years later. Does it mean a lot? No but it is interesting.
 

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Some of my guns are over 100 years old and are still shot and carried. It is just curiosity on my part.
 

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Also, if you find a really nice revolver and then find out it was made in 1960, you know it has been taken care of, a cream puff.
How about 1900? ;)

 
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My collection is similar to yours, Wirenut and I too buy guns I like.
As far as wanting to know the date of manufacture, for me it's just part of the fun of collecting. It gives me an idea of when the gun was made. And that opens up the door for all sorts of information and insight into that era. Like my forum name implies, the older guns in my collection take me on a trip back into time as I learn more about them. :D

John
 

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Based on some of the old farts I shoot with, prefer the earlier S&Ws because of better fit and finish. Some guys won't buy a S&W revolver made after 1978. I have a couple of newer models, but i do prefer the older ones. Also, if you find a really nice revolver and then find out it was made in 1960, you know it has been taken care of, a cream puff.
Well if it is really nice then it is really nice regarless of when it was made.

I have seen lots of gun made in 1960 or before that were in terrible shape.

When it ws made has no correlation to how it was taken care of.

Of course all the collectors feel that Guss the GunSmith could had fit parts better than a CNC machine. MIM parts are just the spawn of Satan and all that other stuff.;)

Yes I like to know the age of a gun as well, usually a Model number and dash along with serial number will get you close enough unless you want a letter from Roy.
 
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