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Discussion Starter #1
I have a model 29-3 that the spent casing extract very difficult if at all. I noticed grooves inside the cyclinder and had the cylinders honed as well as a general tune-up. This did not help the problem at all. I have concluded that the cylinder needs to be replaced. Are all cylinders interchangeable for model 29's? Thanks
 

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Welcome, lumberguy!

Let me ask you, when you first load the gun, do the rounds drop in with no difficulty?
 
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First, let me say ~ Welcome to the Forum... ;)

Are you shooting factory 44 Magnum loads? Have you tried any reduced loads like a 44 Special in the cylinders?

giz
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Empty cases stick with 44 special factory loads and handloads as well as 44 magnum handloads. (all of the above)
 

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I should have included that the problem started after shooting some 44 mag handloads that were too hot. Now even after the cylinder was honed everything sticks. I believe there was un-repairable damage done to the cylinder. I found a new one on midwest shooters supply but the S&W website offers two different part numbers. I will call them tomorrow and order the correct one as the S&W price was comparable. That is of course unless you guys have any other ideas. Thanks
 
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How fine did the honing process go? Ultimately, if any honing operation cross hatching is present ~ I'd suspect that is the problem. Were the cylinders final polished with fine abrasives until a near mirror finish?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am not sure I can tell much of a difference after it was honed. There are still obvious, deep marks in the inside of the cylinder about where the end of a .44 spec case would be. The bluing is a little bit lighter suggesting it was polished or honed.
 
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If there is a cylinder smith in your area...I'd have it reamed and polished. I think that would be the end of your problems.

I've got to ask if there isn't an issue with the cylinders not being cleaned completely after shooting 44 special in them. Sure sounds like a possible issue. They ring the cylinder 1/10" back from where a .44 mag case would end. And that has been known to create extraction issues. If you think that may possibly be the case...there are ways to get them spotlessly clean again.

giz
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That is what I had the gunsmith do or so I thought. I can get a new cylinder for $135 and change it out myself without throwing any more money at this one... The first six casings stuck that I shot right after I got it back from the gunsmith who did a complete cleaning. I thought I had cleaned the cylinders well each time but open to suggestions. thanks
 
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Ok, seeing as your already committed to spending the $135, I'll assume that you won't mind trying a last ditch effort to salvage the cylinder. Everyone else, don't try this at home. ;)

Buy a Brass Cylinder Chamber Brush from a local dealer or online. They are bigger diameter and meant for cylinder work only. Never, ever use them in your guns bore. They are also available in Stainless Steel, which is much more agressive and needs to be used with more care...

Next, get some brand of lead removal bore cleaner and soak those chambers for a good long while. Let the stuff have time to do it's job. Next get a variable speed drill and use a single length of cleaning rod (short section) and chuck it in your drill, then attach the cylinder chamber brush. At low speed slowly run the brush back and forth through each cylinder several times until your sure you've cleaned any evidence of carbon build up in your chambers. Wipe them down and patch until dry. Next get a .45 bore mop and hit it with some Flitz. Same routine polishing out the marks from the chamber brush. Don't overdo either step. You can give it a try and then try again later.....sneak up on it.

Try not to get anything in the ejector rod tube. Use some Hoppes or Rem oil and brush and clean everything spotless ~ when your done. I own the tools to pull the ejector rod out and strip the cylinder down when I do this...but if you exercise great care you can do this with everything in place.

Anyone else wishing to chime in...please lend a hand...or call me an idiot. :) Hey, it's worth a shot....pun intended.

giz
 

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Lumberguy,
IMHO, Giz has it nailed.
Here's why:
If the cylinder was honed and not reamed (or 'chased'), what you're describing...that mark where a .44 special case would end...is 100% sure to make extraction difficult, particularly after that cylinder heats up.
The cylinder on a 29 is tough as whale poop, and short of splitting it and blowing the topstrap off, I seriously doubt that a hot handload deformed the charge-holes.
After it's been properly reamed, then honed with two grades of honing tools (using the proper cutting/honing oil), it'll be just fine. ;)
Don
 

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lumberguy said:
Empty cases stick with 44 special factory loads and handloads as well as 44 magnum handloads. (all of the above)
I agree with the guys, but something must be addressed. Improperly made reloads will stick if over pressured loads are used. This is hand loading 101.
Also, I bet you have crud in that cylinder which could cause the empties from falling out.

Take a good light and look inside, if you have a built up ridge of lead etc, it must be removed. Use a CHAMBER brush like Gizamo suggests.
Good luck, I sure it will be just fine after a little TLC.
 
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