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Discussion Starter #1
Cast Performance 300gr GCFP over 21.5gr of H110. WLP primer and Winchester brass. Loaded up some with 22.0 grains as well.

I use a Redding profile crimp die and just don't know if I'm satisfied with this crimp. I've never loaded "thumper" rounds before as all my reloading has been geared towards softer 45 Colt CAS loads and gamer loads for IDPA and USPSA.

What do you think?

 

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I don't think I like that. It looks to tight and at least I would say it would shorten the useful life of the case using it. I would go with a little roll crimp myself!
 
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Kinda like a Marine Corp crimp....High and tight ;) I will say a couple of things about it....first off the choice of H110 in any reloading thread has to mention the absolute need for a magnum primer. Even pro's like Brian Pearce have caught themselves on this issue and made amends in subsequent discussions. With the thumpers, you still can get away with a good roll crimp ~ enough to hold the bullets in place and not jump the cannelure, yet not so much to risk a high pressure load. With the big/bad boys I work up to a working load in small increments, until I'm satisfied with what the load is supposed to accomplish. Truth be told, I've never found a thumper load that I didn't back off a bit....

The big question is what gun are you shooting it in...I assume a TCA's or a Ruger.

giz
 

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I have to say I agree with Dave. It looks like too much crimp, to me.

I'm not familiar with that die. What happens if you back off on the crimp?

Personally, I use the Lee Factory Crimp die for just one reason. It produces a really nice rounded crimp...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
From what I understand, 21.5 of H110 was what Cast Performance recommends. I do not know if that is low end or not. I figured it was as I've seen H110 loads up to 23 grains for the 300 grainers. It was even suggested by another to start at 22, but I figured I'd go with what Cast Performance told me. I defnitely don't want to go below the low end considering it's H110.

I've always used WLP primers and I figured that since it says for standard or magnum loads on the box, then they would work fine. I also understand that Winchester primers run a little hotter than others.

And to be honest, I wasn't sure if this was even enough crimp. The factory crimp on some of 454's was much more than this. I was surprised when you guys said that it was too much. :lol:

My concern was that the crimp groove on these pills is HUGE. I can't help but think that the crimp is only halfway into the crimp groove and was concerned that I might still get some bullet pull (maybe they would if they were loaded hotter, but I figured this is a fairly stout load and didn't want to take the chance).

I've had this Redding for a lot of years and it does make a nice roll crimp. I just turned it down a bit to get the same kind of crimp I've seen on factory 454's. That might have been a mistake.

I use the Lee crimp dies on my Dillon for 45 ACP.

These will be getting shot in a Ruger Redhawk. Now I'm concerned with shooting them at all with the talk of increased pressure. Maybe I outta pull em' and start over. :(

Man, this is a lot different than loading up a few hundred rounds of 9mm or 45ACP on the Dillon. :shock:
 

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Well, I can say this..... with a square channelure, such as on your cases, they will lengthen a good deal with a few loadings and you'll be forced to trim them. The heavier the load, the quicker this channelure will flatten out. But you have to trim you will no doubt notice some inconsistencies in your crimp.

One good thing about an "overcrimp" such as you show is that before you trim, if you set your dies to crimp like this based upon your longest cases, you will ALWAYS have some sort of crimp and you will stand a better chance of controlling vertical stringing because of variations in bullet pull resistance.

While I an not completely comfortable with this crimp, I don't think it will hurt anything or push pressures beyond the pale, but working the brass that much may shorten case life as you find mouth cracks.

If you trim your cases and square the mouths, be sure to reset your crimp dies for the new case length.

Drew
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Excellant information Drew. I really appreciate it. I only loaded up 5, so after these, I'll back the crimp off a bit.

I'm not sure what the other type of channelure is called, it's not flat like this, but rather simply a "crease", but not textured like on some .357mag brass. I 'spose it would flatten out as well over time.

I mostly use Starline and had this stuff, as well as some Remington, in a bag and figured I'd use it up.

Thanks again everyone for helping me out! :D
 

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Glad to help Bud!

Because I hate trimming handgun cases so much, I find myself buying new brass in large lots so each individual case see less frequent loadings. Where ever possible, I only buy those of the non-channelured type.

After 10-12 loadings I give them to my kids.... :lol:

Also, I try to keep cases at close to the same length by putting up several hundred or a thousand rounds of the same recipe and reloading them again as a lot.

I also reset my crimp dies for every lot. Long ago, I started off using nothing but a roll crimp, but of late, I have come to appreciate the tapered crimp due to the fact that it's less sensitive to case length. But I'm not sure if it's as consistent or as positive in a theoretical way as a roll crimp.

But for fast shooting at steel plates at 20-25 yards I see no real difference.

Drew
 

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all technical comments aside....my own experience with 'thumper loads' was just that....& I didn't enjoy them nearly as much as I had anticipated....always had better results moving up in caliber if I wanted more thump....

but that is one of the charms of home-built ammo....Cheers to your experiment!

Full case of Goex behind cast 500 grainer in a 45-70...now there's a thumper I can enjoy.....
 

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Great photo! shows plenty of detail...

I get a crimp that looks just like that when the bullet is seated a little too deep into the case - and the roll crimp started a tad too late on the pull of the lever.

I guessing that you are seating the bullet and rolling the crimp both on the same stroke of the lever. Lately, I've been seating the bullet and rolling the crimp on separate steps on my precision revolver handloads to keep this from happening.

If you want to continue to do both in the same step, I believe that you'll get a more normal-looking roll crimp if you back out your seating plug ~1 turn or so and screw in the whole die ~1/2 turn or so.

xtm
 

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Discussion Starter #13
xtimberman said:
I guessing that you are seating the bullet and rolling the crimp both on the same stroke of the lever. Lately, I've been seating the bullet and rolling the crimp on separate steps on my precision revolver handloads to keep this from happening.

If you want to continue to do both in the same step, I believe that you'll get a more normal-looking roll crimp if you back out your seating plug ~1 turn or so and screw in the whole die ~1/2 turn or so.

xtm
I'm actually doing the seating and crimp in two steps. Seating with my RCBS seating die and crimping with a Redding Profile Crimp Series A die for 45 Colt/454 Casull. I lower the seating plug and back the die up a bit so that it does not crimp at all.

I think you're right in that I seated the bullet just a smidge too low. Maybe the crimp would have gone into the crimp groove a little better if I had not done so.

I generally only seat and crimp at the same time with Cowboy loads. I even use a seperate Lee taper crimp die for doing 9mm and 45ACP on the Dillon.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
m657 said:
all technical comments aside....my own experience with 'thumper loads' was just that....& I didn't enjoy them nearly as much as I had anticipated....always had better results moving up in caliber if I wanted more thump....

but that is one of the charms of home-built ammo....Cheers to your experiment!

Full case of Goex behind cast 500 grainer in a 45-70...now there's a thumper I can enjoy.....
These are my bear loads. Definitely not going to be plinking with 'em. ;)

My normal load is mild 250's with Red Dot, Unique, or Clays.
 
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