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Discussion Starter #1
First off I need to say hi to everyone, haven't been around much, minor health issues.
Back to business, here's a question for y'all. Whatthehellisthis (yes, all one word). The muzzle end measures about .252 and in one pic it has some markings on the receiver that look Chinese or Japanese to me but who knows. It has a bayonet lug and is in pretty rough condition.
1.jpg 3.jpg 5.jpg
 

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M-38 6.5 Jap. Fine round. Fine rifle. Very strong. If bore is chromed, will likely be a good shooter. Do a google for more info. Go slow on the rifle. Find out factory, year, etc. Some of those w/ intact Chrysanthemums are worth a bit of decent money. Norma makes good modern ammo for this rifle. Sincerely. bruce.
 

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The Mum on the receiver nearly tripled the value of your rifle. Probably worth somewhere around $500-600, maybe even more if the bore is sound, and it can be shot.
Do an internet search for an Arisaka collectors group. They'll be able to give you even more info than we can from here.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It doesn't belong to me and it is in such rough shape shooting it is totally out of the equation. A friend of mine had a neighbor pass away and the guys wife gave it to my friend. He isn't much on "computer machines" so I told him that I would look into it for him because he had no idea what it was. I guess the neighbor was pretty old and perhaps he brought it home from overseas. I appreciate all the help from the members here on identifying it for him but the trouble is now he thinks I'm smart.
 

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Some of the rifles towards the end of the war had heat-treat issues. Cool piece for a collection but I wouldn't shoot it.
Yer thinking Type 99 'Last Ditch' Arisakas. The Type 38's had the strongest bolt actions ever known. Proven by several blow-up tests by wildcatters like Parker Ackley.
 

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It doesn't belong to me and it is in such rough shape shooting it is totally out of the equation. A friend of mine had a neighbor pass away and the guys wife gave it to my friend. He isn't much on "computer machines" so I told him that I would look into it for him because he had no idea what it was. I guess the neighbor was pretty old and perhaps he brought it home from overseas. I appreciate all the help from the members here on identifying it for him but the trouble is now he thinks I'm smart.
Japanese rifles are really starting to come up in value. Especially with the Mum intact. Overlooked and neglected for many years , they were made into wall hangers , lamps , and simply thrown away.
 

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Not trying to hijack the thread, BUT could a Rockwell hardness test tell if the metal had been heat treated? It would leave a tiny indentation, but I've always wondered if it would confirm heat treatment.
 

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Not trying to hijack the thread, BUT could a Rockwell hardness test tell if the metal had been heat treated? It would leave a tiny indentation, but I've always wondered if it would confirm heat treatment.
Hardness does not always equal toughness. Hardness does coincide with brittleness however. Different steels heat treat differently. Type 38's and early Type 99's were very high in molybdenum , which made for very tough steels , as evidenced by the Samurai swords. Early '03 Springfield actions were plain high-carbon steel. High on the surface hardness (57-60 Rockwell C) , but as we now know , usually brittle. The post-WWI thru WWII'03 actions made from nickel-steel alloy were usually in the 53-55c range.
 
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