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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to decide on a cal. for a new hunting rifle. Decided that Savage is the brand. I can't afford anything over $700.00 and Savage has some rifles in that price range. I will be hunting whitetail , maybe mule deer and possibly Elk(if I'm lucky).
I'm recoil sensitive and gave my 30-06 to my son. I'm thinking of these choices 308 or 270. I do shoot 45-70 for fun but those rifles have open sights and my aging eyes aren't what they used to be. With a good scope I feel I'm good to about 200 yrds. I'll hunt from a ground blind most of the time.
 

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If the recoil is getting to you, I'd suggest a 30-30 for whitetails, but not for elk. There are a number of options in a scoped 30-30.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If the recoil is getting to you, I'd suggest a 30-30 for whitetails, but not for elk. There are a number of options in a scoped 30-30.
I have a Winchester 30-30 , but since it's top eject It's my understanding that it is not scope friendly. Since I've had this rifle for 60 yrs ( I'm 70 ) I want it to stay unmolested. It has been a "meat stick" over the years but with my older eyes I want a scoped bolt rifle. The reaso for my choice in Savage is that the savage 110 Apex has adjustable stock and trigger. It can be adjusted to suit my needs and shooting style. It also comes with a factory mounted 3-9x40 Vortex Crossfire II scope. It's not availabe in 300 Blackout or 30-30. My 30-30 has taken Elk in yrs. gone by. At one time it was the only "high powered rifle" I owned. My longest shot was about 75 yrds. with irons.
 

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My go to is a custom 308 which cost 5 times + what your budget is but I prefer a 308 for a number of reasons, mainly availability of ammunition commercially. I realize it's not there right now and if you can find it, it's expensive, but I also feel that the lack of supply will lessen at some point and boutique' calibers like 300 WM, 6.5 2.84, 338 Lapua and others will never be plentiful unless you handload them (which I do), but the 308 is available in many loadings and is extremely lethal on small and large game at distances far greater than 200 yards, in fact, terminal ballistics will tell you that with the proper cartridge and propellant load, a 308 is well capable of taking any game animal in North America to 400 yards after which the kinetic energy and bullet drop lessens to the point where a clean kill becomes a crap shoot and I've proved that time and time again in my own hunts and all the animals I have on the walls were taken with my 308 and most were one shot, one kill.

You can purchase a reasonably priced Savage for less than your budget but you need to factor in a good optic and quality mounts (I just happen to use Bruce Talley one piece mounts). I don't like multi part mounts like Leupold. I learned a long time ago that the more parts in any mount. the more chance of them coming loose and impacting POI.

I do like the Savage accutrigger, everyone in the business has copied it because it's an excellent and very adjustable trigger. Some have improved on it, like Kidd and Jewel, Timney and Remington with their industry standard 700 action but, the accutrigger remains the least expensive and most adjustable in a mass produced trigger group on the planet.

Their accustock is pretty good as well, but a true pillar bedded action and full float barrel is better but costs more.

Strum Ruger also makes an inexpensive 308 bolt gun as well. Fit and finish isn't in the Savage class but they work as well and for top shelf and top of your budget, I's suggest considering a Kimber Mountain Extreme. Light and right and the older we get, the more a light stick is appreciated.

None of them will have wood furniture. All will be some type of synthetic. Wood is heavy, wood costs more to produce and wood absorbs moisture so wood is out for good reason. Tube and action selection will be limited as well. Actions will be steel or a blend of aluminum, steel and maybe some titanium and the tubes will be steel or stainless. I prefer steel over stainless but it's a personal choice. Mine are Cerakoted which prevent moisture rust and Cerakote is becoming the industry standard anyway and unlike bluing, it's easy to recoat or even change colors but it's not as durable as it's basically a powder coat low temp ceramic coating. You can even do it at home and use your wife's oven....lol

Just my take on a medium range hunting stick. I've had superior results with mine over the years and I've never worried about loosing my ammunition on some airplane flight and then not having anything to go bang 1000 miles from home. Of course I prefer my handloads over any commercial ammunition but push comes to shove, I can get the ammo if I need it.
 
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Daryl's background in mechanics, metallurgy and experience hunting at high accuracy have guided his advice above. Literally, if you're going to do it, do it right.

If you need a new low cost hunting rifle, I would also suggest you look into the Ruger American. They did a really good job on it. I don't own one, but have examined them at the shop I help.

If you already have optics from another gun, you can make the improvements incrementally.

Since Ruger acquired Marlin's business, there may be some interesting things happening there too.

I know you're looking for something new, but about 10 years ago, I bought a superbly reworked M1903 MK1 that had been sporterized by a well regarded Southern Ohio gunsmith. It's .30-06 caliber of course, and has the recoil you don't want - but it's an ideal (for me) hunting rifle. I think I have $250 in it total...
 

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Both calibers are good choices, but I think you will find that all else being equal (weight, stock design etc.) the .270 will have a little less recoil. Not a huge difference, but some. Buy the best scope you can afford (used can be a real bargain) , The Savage line and the Ruger American are good rifles. Hear good thing about Mossberg, but never owned one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well I have decided on the Savage 110 Apex Hunter XP. Now all I have to do is either find one or see if it can be ordered in a timely fashion. Probably easier said than done...
 

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Availability of anything could be a challenge. Wife wanted some 22 snake shot to shoot at the hawks that are killing chickens none to be found. on gun broker box of 50 but buy it now at $165. Good luck hunting at least you have a goal
 

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I have a NUB Savage Axis in 243 if you're interested
 

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My go to is a custom 308 which cost 5 times + what your budget is but I prefer a 308 for a number of reasons, mainly availability of ammunition commercially. I realize it's not there right now and if you can find it, it's expensive, but I also feel that the lack of supply will lessen at some point and boutique' calibers like 300 WM, 6.5 2.84, 338 Lapua and others will never be plentiful unless you handload them (which I do), but the 308 is available in many loadings and is extremely lethal on small and large game at distances far greater than 200 yards, in fact, terminal ballistics will tell you that with the proper cartridge and propellant load, a 308 is well capable of taking any game animal in North America to 400 yards after which the kinetic energy and bullet drop lessens to the point where a clean kill becomes a crap shoot and I've proved that time and time again in my own hunts and all the animals I have on the walls were taken with my 308 and most were one shot, one kill.

You can purchase a reasonably priced Savage for less than your budget but you need to factor in a good optic and quality mounts (I just happen to use Bruce Talley one piece mounts). I don't like multi part mounts like Leupold. I learned a long time ago that the more parts in any mount. the more chance of them coming loose and impacting POI.

I do like the Savage accutrigger, everyone in the business has copied it because it's an excellent and very adjustable trigger. Some have improved on it, like Kidd and Jewel, Timney and Remington with their industry standard 700 action but, the accutrigger remains the least expensive and most adjustable in a mass produced trigger group on the planet.

Their accustock is pretty good as well, but a true pillar bedded action and full float barrel is better but costs more.

Strum Ruger also makes an inexpensive 308 bolt gun as well. Fit and finish isn't in the Savage class but they work as well and for top shelf and top of your budget, I's suggest considering a Kimber Mountain Extreme. Light and right and the older we get, the more a light stick is appreciated.

None of them will have wood furniture. All will be some type of synthetic. Wood is heavy, wood costs more to produce and wood absorbs moisture so wood is out for good reason. Tube and action selection will be limited as well. Actions will be steel or a blend of aluminum, steel and maybe some titanium and the tubes will be steel or stainless. I prefer steel over stainless but it's a personal choice. Mine are Cerakoted which prevent moisture rust and Cerakote is becoming the industry standard anyway and unlike bluing, it's easy to recoat or even change colors but it's not as durable as it's basically a powder coat low temp ceramic coating. You can even do it at home and use your wife's oven....lol

Just my take on a medium range hunting stick. I've had superior results with mine over the years and I've never worried about loosing my ammunition on some airplane flight and then not having anything to go bang 1000 miles from home. Of course I prefer my handloads over any commercial ammunition but push comes to shove, I can get the ammo if I need it.
The Kimber 84M and Savage 110 were produced in wooden stocks.


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I'm also in the 70s age group, and have reverted back to 30-30, like I began. There is no way I would consider altering my Winchester 94, but use a older Marlin 336 with a scope to compensate for age - eyes. Being familiar with the caliber helps, and recoil is not a issue. Also, fun to reload.
 
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