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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I watched this April review of the CSX by The Honest Outlaw:

One gripe he had was with the dongle preventing a reset unless your finger was completely off of the trigger. Apparenty, he didn't look to see what the dongle does, which is kind of like what the grip safety does on a 1911 in that it blocks the trigger from moving until depressed. I can't figure out how the dongle would impede the reset.

I tested the reset on my CSX the same way he did, and found that the reset occured before the trigger returned all the way forward and while the dongle was still depressed.

He did have a good point, though: what is the point of having the thumb safety and a trigger block? With the safety on or off, the trigger block does not make the pistol any safer. Did S&W just wanted to make CSX look safer?
 

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I watched this April review of the CSX by The Honest Outlaw:

One gripe he had was with the dongle preventing a reset unless your finger was completely off of the trigger. Apparenty, he didn't look to see what the dongle does, which is kind of like what the grip safety does on a 1911 in that it blocks the trigger from moving until depressed. I can't figure out how the dongle would impede the reset.

I tested the reset on my CSX the same way he did, and found that the reset occured before the trigger returned all the way forward and while the dongle was still depressed.

He did have a good point, though: what is the point of having the thumb safety and a trigger block? With the safety on or off, the trigger block does not make the pistol any safer. Did S&W just wanted to make CSX look safer?
It's a drop safety. Granted the gun also has a firing pin block, but it it were dropped on the butt/beaver tail and the trigger actuated via inertia the firing pin stop would be defeated and the hammer dropped by the inadvertent trigger press. So it doesn't just look safer, it factually is safer for having the dingus there. And the way the dingus is designed has no bearing on the trigger pull, break, or reset (as you pointed out).

I pointed out in the comments of that video there's no way the trigger dingus could cause a false reset. Not that anyone would really read those. I certainly wouldn't expect Outlaw to see it and fix the incorrect information in his video.
 

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It's a drop safety. Granted the gun also has a firing pin block, but it it were dropped on the butt/beaver tail and the trigger actuated via inertia the firing pin stop would be defeated and the hammer dropped by the inadvertent trigger press. So it doesn't just look safer, it factually is safer for having the dingus there. And the way the dingus is designed has no bearing on the trigger pull, break, or reset (as you pointed out).

I pointed out in the comments of that video there's no way the trigger dingus could cause a false reset. Not that anyone would really read those. I certainly wouldn't expect Outlaw to see it and fix the incorrect information in his video.
How can it be a "drop safety" when all it does is pivot out of the way so the trigger can be pulled? Better go back and check. As I've stated here before I won't own a plastic/aluminum pistol with a dingus in the trigger. Glad I got all my Shields with the hinged trigger. The dingus on the CSX is redundant.
 

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How can it be a "drop safety" when all it does is pivot out of the way so the trigger can be pulled? Better go back and check. As I've stated here before I won't own a plastic/aluminum pistol with a dingus in the trigger. Glad I got all my Shields with the hinged trigger. The dingus on the CSX is redundant.
That's the exact same thing your hinged trigger does. They serve the same purpose.
 

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@The Happy Kaboomer .. here is a pretty good explanation of what a drop safety is and does.

"These are passive safeties located inside a handgun that consist of mechanisms that prevent the firearm from discharging when dropped or roughly handled. They work by providing an obstruction between the firing mechanism and the cartridge and are attached to the trigger."
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Dongle, dingus, trigger thingie. Sure would be nice if S&W gave us a parts list with the official parts names.....

Argee: That description works for the CSX and those pistols with the firing pin safety disconnect dingus, but not for pistols such as hammer fired CZ's, the Browning BDM, and probably others where the trigger bar engages a lever/lifter to disengage the firing pin safety.
 

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It's a drop safety. Granted the gun also has a firing pin block, but it it were dropped on the butt/beaver tail and the trigger actuated via inertia the firing pin stop would be defeated and the hammer dropped by the inadvertent trigger press.

[*snip*]
But isn't the dingus redundant to an engaged thumb safety? That is, the trigger can't acuate with the thumb safety engaged.

Is S&W perhaps thinking someone may want to carry the CSX cocked and unlocked, relying on the dingus to prevent an ND?

Thanks.
 

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>Is S&W perhaps thinking someone may want to carry the CSX cocked and unlocked, relying on the dingus to prevent an ND? <<
Answering my own question, quote from the CSX manual:

NOTE: IF THE USER CHOOSES TO CARRY THE PISTOL IN THE CHAMBER
LOADED AND HAMMER COCKED CONDITION, THE MANUAL SAFETY LEVER
MUST BE UP IN THE SAFE POSITION EXCEPT WHEN IN THE PROCESS OF
FIRING.
 

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But isn't the dingus redundant to an engaged thumb safety? That is, the trigger can't acuate with the thumb safety engaged.

Is S&W perhaps thinking someone may want to carry the CSX cocked and unlocked, relying on the dingus to prevent an ND?

Thanks.
Guns get dropped. There's no guarantee that life won't happen when one might have the safety disengaged for whatever reason one might have the safety disengaged. Shooting in the backyard and the dog decides now is a good time to run up and jump on their owner. Cleaning the gun and disengaging the safety because it's ingrained from years of operating a 1911. The cat knocks something off the shelf and gives the gun-owner a start before the gun is fully unloaded. Cornered and have to use the gun for self defense, but the assailant is close enough to get a hand on the shooter/their gun and knock it away. I know we all like to think 'that's never happened to me' (knock on wood,) or 'that never will/can't happen to me' (knock on wood again). But all those people this kind of thing has happened to? Yeah, it never happened to them before it happened, and they never thought it would/could happen to them until it did either.

As far as redundancy goes, the same can be said for the grip safety on a 1911. Or either of the safeties on a Springfield XD. If one of the safeties is working and not deactivated when it shouldn't be, doesn't it make the others redundant? Sure. But there's value in redundant systems. If one system fails, or is intentionally deactivated when maybe it shouldn't be, the next system in the chain might prevent an un-intentional/negligent discharge.

In theory.

We all know what they say about trying to make things idiot-proof. The moment you succeed, someone will decide to make a better idiot.
 

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Thanks.

The grip safety analogy is a good one. I remember now reading a review (or reviews?) that suggest putting the safety on the trigger makes more sense than the grip. YMMV.

The dingus doesn't bother me. As you allude to, gives the CSX an additional safety feature besides the thumb safety, similar to a 1911. Unlike other "micro 1911s," such as the P238, P938, and Kimber Micro 9, which only have a thumb safety.
 

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Correct, honest outlaw did a good review but he’s mistaken here. The double reset is bad timing of the trigger bar jumping the step in the safety bar and then jumping on top of the seer… along with a bunch of rough edges that need de-burred and polished. If they happen simultaneously it feels perfect. Mine does now.

The safeties are not redundant. They happen in sequence. 1-if you pull on the trigger with your fingernail or pick without touching the trigger safety bar, it stops short of the seer making it nearly impossible to release the hammer. When you pull normal, it simply roles out of the way allowing full movement. 2- When the thumb safety is on it moves the disconnector down, pushing the trigger bar down, so the trigger bar cannot engage the seer. 3-in the final stage before “bang” the very top of the safety bar depresses the pin block plunger, disengaging it. This is the same function the grip safety does on a 1911. The pin block is what ultimately prevents the gun from firing if dropped, even if the hammer falls, 4- finally the trigger bar pushes seer off the hammer and releases it.

Stages 3 and 4 are simultaneous or at least overlapping. Important thing is that the pin block disengages before the hammer is released. This accounts for an additional pound of trigger pull on this gun. A grip safety would have made this still a safe gun with a much lighter trigger, and attracted even more 1911-2011 lovers.

People can call the safeties, redundant but they are all different, and as a group pretty effective. Take care, and be safe.
 
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