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Discussion Starter #1
I have heard the term for years and know a fair amount of people who have sent off their guns to be "crowned" but .. I dont think I know what the benefit is supposed to be?

My new Ruger boasts an 11 degree crown or some such but .. why is that a selling point and why do people spend good money to have it done on their guns?

crown1.JPG

Crown.JPG
 

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To clean up the end of the rifling on dinged-up guns. Else, no benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
To clean up the end of the rifling on dinged-up guns. Else, no benefit.
So I guess it would also protect the rifling from getting dinged up. I thought it was an accuracy thing but if that is the case I guess its more for the gamers who might beat up their gun? Cool ... hole in my gun knowledge base!
 

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So I guess it would also protect the rifling from getting dinged up. I thought it was an accuracy thing but if that is the case I guess its more for the gamers who might beat up their gun? Cool ... hole in my gun knowledge base!
All of the above in your post; cleans up the muzzle and helps protect the rifling at the muzzle for improved accuracy
 

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The benefit of a proper crown is so that when the bullet leaves the barrel, the gas escapes evenly around the bullet base. If it doesn't do that, it is possible that the bullet could be cocked by gasses on one side exiting before those on the other. A recessed muzzle protects the rifling from damage. The crown is necessary for accuracy, not the recess.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The benefit of a proper crown is so that when the bullet leaves the barrel, the gas escapes evenly around the bullet base. If it doesn't do that, it is possible that the bullet could be cocked by gasses on one side exiting before those on the other. A recessed muzzle protects the rifling from damage. The crown is necessary for accuracy, not the recess.
Perfect! Now I understand. Been shooting forever and didn't get it. Living proof your not to old to learn something new!
 
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Well said Ratzo!
And the reason that, whenever possible, we should always clean a barrel from the breech end, to prevent wear of the muzzle crown.

John
 

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Military rifles like the Garand and M1A are cleaned from the muzzle end. The GI steel cleaning rods causes wear on the crown and can destroy accuracy. Crowning has a restorative effect for accuracy in those rifles. It can make a huge difference in some cases.
I had a Ruger 10/22 that had a very poor crown. It scraped the cleaning rod because it was so sharp. I had it crowned and it made a huge difference in making better accuracy.
Recrowning a barrel can’t hurt a firearm unless incorrectly done and can make a huge difference in accuracy.
 

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Recrowning a barrel can’t hurt a firearm unless incorrectly done and can make a huge difference in accuracy.
Actually, not hard to do, if damage to lands or grooves isn't great. I've done it myself using a large, round-headed brass screw chucked into a hand-drill with valve-grinding compound as the cutting agent; not my idea, but found in various gunsmithing books. Bet it would have worked to remove that burr on your Ruger.
 

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Actually, not hard to do, if damage to lands or grooves isn't great. I've done it myself using a large, round-headed brass screw chucked into a hand-drill with valve-grinding compound as the cutting agent; not my idea, but found in various gunsmithing books. Bet it would have worked to remove that burr on your Ruger.
i was thinking that when I got to your post. Mentioned a lot in the old days.
 

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Actually, not hard to do, if damage to lands or grooves isn't great. I've done it myself using a large, round-headed brass screw chucked into a hand-drill with valve-grinding compound as the cutting agent; not my idea, but found in various gunsmithing books. Bet it would have worked to remove that burr on your Ruger.


I've done it that way, w/ a steady hand it works fine.
 
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