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Like most things from the past those boxes aren't just boxes of ammo, they seem to be works of art. Ammo boxes these days just aren't done so well, IMO of course... Thanks for sharing the photo.
 

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Ahhh....Federal "Monark" .22 ammo (4th. row down, far left, red w/blue lettering). Sure brings back the memories. When I was a youngster (50's) my Dad was a CBM in the Navy and was a tug boat skipper in the Norfolk Navy Yard. He was always pulling ammo barges up & down the James River. In those days the military would anchor an ammo barge in the Chesapeake Bay, usually with a young Marine on board to guard its contents until the military moved it to its destination. At times the weather was brutal and the Marine guard had terrible conditions on the open ammo barge. When Dad hooked onto one, he would always have the Marine come on board to warm up, have some hot chow, and join him in the Tug boat pilot house while moving the barge. In those days the military used Federal Monark .22's for practice. As I recall they were regular lead with a wax exterior lube on the bullet. Before the ride was over, Dad would "trade" a 5 gallon tin of ground coffee to the Marine for a wooden crate of Monark .22's. Almost every summer we would go to my Grandparents in East Texas for a month. I had (still have) my Marlin Model 39 .22 rifle. Every day Dad would hand me a brick (500) of those Monark .22's and tell me to come home when they were gone. I would take a canteen, a couple of my Grandmothers sausage biscuits, and hit the woods. I spent untold hours in the woods, and fired literally untold crates of those Federal Monark .22's. The old Marlin still shoots straight and it is the only rifle I can hit over extended distances using "Kentucky Windage", because I've done it so many thousands of times. Yes, that Federal Monark box sure brings back memories.
 

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I use to buy that Western Super X for $.50 a box and shoot jack rabbits at $.50 apiece. Aim for the eyeball, one shot, one rabbit. Them was the good ol days.
 

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In the first pic, on the bottom row is a box of Canuck. I just happened to see a brick box with that name yesterday at the LGS. never heard of it before and came back u this thread to see if it was included and it was. Pretty cool. Anybody know any history of that brand?
 

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Canuck was/is made in Canada by CIL , Canadian Industries Limited. Also seen with the Monarch and Dominion brand.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the comments and replies . I agree with the observation that some of these are works of art . Oh the memories :)
 

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Thanks for the comments and replies . I agree with the observation that some of these are works of art . Oh the memories :)
I remember around Xmas time , 500rd bricks of Remington HV with 'Golden Bullets would be around $9.99 and ya got yer choice of a free pen knife or belt buckle.
 

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Talk about timing....I make this post today, and look what showed-up on the doorstep this afternoon:



DocZeus
AKA
The "I Do NOT Have A Problem...Really" One.....
 

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Ahhh....Federal "Monark" .22 ammo (4th. row down, far left, red w/blue lettering). Sure brings back the memories. When I was a youngster (50's) my Dad was a CBM in the Navy and was a tug boat skipper in the Norfolk Navy Yard. He was always pulling ammo barges up & down the James River. In those days the military would anchor an ammo barge in the Chesapeake Bay, usually with a young Marine on board to guard its contents until the military moved it to its destination. At times the weather was brutal and the Marine guard had terrible conditions on the open ammo barge. When Dad hooked onto one, he would always have the Marine come on board to warm up, have some hot chow, and join him in the Tug boat pilot house while moving the barge. In those days the military used Federal Monark .22's for practice. As I recall they were regular lead with a wax exterior lube on the bullet. Before the ride was over, Dad would "trade" a 5 gallon tin of ground coffee to the Marine for a wooden crate of Monark .22's. Almost every summer we would go to my Grandparents in East Texas for a month. I had (still have) my Marlin Model 39 .22 rifle. Every day Dad would hand me a brick (500) of those Monark .22's and tell me to come home when they were gone. I would take a canteen, a couple of my Grandmothers sausage biscuits, and hit the woods. I spent untold hours in the woods, and fired literally untold crates of those Federal Monark .22's. The old Marlin still shoots straight and it is the only rifle I can hit over extended distances using "Kentucky Windage", because I've done it so many thousands of times. Yes, that Federal Monark box sure brings back memories.
Very interesting story 👍
 
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