Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well between all the moves from this house, too that house my cleaning supplies are all over the place or in the garage. However, they were cleaning kits for my 40 ACP and 9mm. Now it's time to get something for the new AR15.

Barrel - Interesting, I see the new thing is using a bore sock for the barrel. Question for those of you who use this sock, do you still use a rod and that bristle brush? Or, does the sock get enough of the carbon off?

Bolt carrier group - Compared to my pistol, after cleaning I usually just leave a little bit of oil on the rails. I hear/see from youtube people using grease. I would think the grease would collect a lot of gunk. Had I not seen that, I would have cleaned it, and just put a little only on the parts that slide. Could you clarify or help me see the light with the grease?

Things to purchase - Bore sock, cleaning solution, clothes or old tee shirts, I still see the gun oil for metal protection maybe just for inside. Or maybe grease.

What kits do you all have, or is more a-la-cart?

I haven't taken apart a M16 since 1984. It's been awhile.

I will stop by fleet farm tomorrow they should have some supplies.

Semper Fi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,312 Posts
Yesterday I ran a couple wet patches through my Mini-14. I decided to try my bore snake. I pulled it through twice. Went back to brush & patches and used another dozen patches. The snake didnt seem to take much of anything out of the barrel. Many people rub a little 5W-30 on the bolt & carrier. I just use gun oil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,435 Posts
Generally, I don’t use a bore snake unless I already have the bore cleaned with patch and brush. They stay cleaner longer that way. Sometimes, I quickly run one to be sure the bore is clear of excess oil after storage, before a range session. It’s not a primary go-to item in my kit.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Masterchither

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Jumping in on this. I hear now that you need to run the cleaning rod or snake from the breech to the muzzle, not going from the muzzle to the breech? I grew up putting the cleaning rod in the muzzle. Does it really make a difference?
 
  • Like
Reactions: jeepnut

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yesterday I ran a couple wet patches through my Mini-14. I decided to try my bore snake. I pulled it through twice. Went back to brush & patches and used another dozen patches. The snake didnt seem to take much of anything out of the barrel. Many people rub a little 5W-30 on the bolt & carrier. I just use gun oil
Thank you, that's was I was curious about if it did anything at all. The snake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hubby uses bore snakes sometimes. My experience has been the same as above. A waste of time.
Thank you, sounds like you are saving me from making a waste of time too!
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShooterGranny

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Generally, I don’t use a bore snake unless I already have the bore cleaned with patch and brush. They stay cleaner longer that way. Sometimes, I quickly run one to be sure the bore is clear of excess oil after storage, before a range session. It’s not a primary go-to item in my kit.
Thank you, now that makes sense using it to remove any excess.... I could do that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I use the brush and swabs on the guns shot heavily. If I shoot 10 rounds as in testing reloads then will use a bore snake but I use the next caliber larger when possible. I use jun plain gun oil on the slides and bolts.
Thank you, I am an oil man myself. It was interesting to see grease being used. No wear and tear from just using the oil?
 
  • Like
Reactions: jeepnut

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,617 Posts
Looks like a cute bag, I will have to see who sells it near me.
You may come to appreciate the brush and squeegee system.

Jumping in on this. I hear now that you need to run the cleaning rod or snake from the breech to the muzzle, not going from the muzzle to the breech? I grew up putting the cleaning rod in the muzzle. Does it really make a difference?
Seems to me like a good idea to have crud go out of the gun rather than into it.

Just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,435 Posts
I forgot your question about grease. Unless your manual calls for grease, don’t bother. I keep a small tub of Lubraplate for my M1 Garand. Just a very thin film on a few key areas. If used anywhere else, less is more and none is better. I really don’t think you’ll need it. I’ll never see the bottom of that small tub of grease and neither will my grandkids. :giggle:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Masterchither

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,691 Posts
I use bore snakes - but not for the complete cleaning of a gun.

I always oil the barrel rifling last when I clean a gun. That means that I always remove the oil first before shooting the gun the next time. The bore snake is a great tool for that.

For revolvers, a bore snake is helpful because you can pull from the breech to the muzzle, and avoid inserting cleaning tools in the muzzle end. On a semi-auto you always use a bore snake from the breech end in any case.

When I have finished at the range, I run the bore snake through the gun a few times. This gets the loose dirt, but it is not adequate for a deeper cleaning which should be done periodically.

Most people clean guns to often and too aggressively. This can lead to excess wear - and sometimes even more wear that shooting itself causes. For that reason I don't do a complete cleaning every time I shoot a couple of hundred rounds. I keep track, and after 500 or so, I do a full cleaning.

I don't spare the rod, and don't spoil the child when I clean. That is a rod, brass brush, patches, Hoppes No. 9, more patches, Q-Tips for action and feed areas and finally oil on a mop for the rifling, and spray oil wiped off for the externals - with field strip as appropriate. I use the brass brush dry first, then get the barrel wet with a patch of Hoppes then use the brush on the mud, cycling it until the patch is pretty dirty. Replace the patch, and try it dry to see how much crud remains. If dirty, wet the patch and start the cycle again. Finish with one or two drops of oil on a mop.

Always work from the breech/chamber end when possible.

The bolt and action parts get their own cleaning and oiling. I don't disassemble an AR-15 bolt unless it's getting fairly dirty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,507 Posts
Thank you, I am an oil man myself. It was interesting to see grease being used. No wear and tear from just using the oil?
No wear with oil as have been doing this for 53 years and no appreciable wear on guns I got as a teenager.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,691 Posts
Oil should be fine.

My typical decision is based on the motion being lubricated. When it slides, grease can be appropriate. When it rotates, oil is generally appropriate.

If you use grease, it must be the correct viscosity, and also not a formulation that attracts water (because of some of the plastics some greases use).

Light oil is often simpler on a pistol.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Masterchither

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I forgot your question about grease. Unless your manual calls for grease, don’t bother. I keep a small tub of Lubraplate for my M1 Garand. Just a very thin film on a few key areas. If used anywhere else, less is more and none is better. I really don’t think you’ll need it. I’ll never see the bottom of that small tub of grease and neither will my grandkids. :giggle:
Thank you! Old School! I forgot to add, I read the manual and it says oil.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1av8r

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I use bore snakes - but not for the complete cleaning of a gun.

I always oil the barrel rifling last when I clean a gun. That means that I always remove the oil first before shooting the gun the next time. The bore snake is a great tool for that.

For revolvers, a bore snake is helpful because you can pull from the breech to the muzzle, and avoid inserting cleaning tools in the muzzle end. On a semi-auto you always use a bore snake from the breech end in any case.

When I have finished at the range, I run the bore snake through the gun a few times. This gets the loose dirt, but it is not adequate for a deeper cleaning which should be done periodically.
I did pick up a kit tonight, it's a nice little kit. But I will eventually pick up a bore snake.

Most people clean guns to often and too aggressively. This can lead to excess wear - and sometimes even more wear that shooting itself causes. For that reason I don't do a complete cleaning every time I shoot a couple of hundred rounds. I keep track, and after 500 or so, I do a full cleaning.
I like this tip, and I agree why wear all your metal away from compulsion! I will balance it out!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top