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Gas, Coal or electric?


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A old Doc friend of mine reps these on the side:

From Old Hickory Pits in MO (He is also a BBQ judge) Brought one out to the gun club for a NFL charity fundraiser and cookout; that thing cooked enough to feed the massive hungry crowd
I'm shopping for on of those right now. We borrowed one from another local prison and it sure takes all the effort out.

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My Louisiana grill Smoker has a window in it, just takes a few minutes to clean it between smokes. I spray it down with Orange Cleaner, wipe it off then rinse with water and it's good to go. Also another point about the Green Mountain Grill Davy Crockett, it can be run off a 12 volt battery. So even if the power goes out, you can still run your smoker.

Joe
 

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Only smoker I ever had was a Brinkman barrel smoker. I used charcoal with wood chips or oak . It had a water pan and I had good results. How you guys feel about water pans in a smoker? I'd like to get an electric smoker that uses biscuit* .Do these smokers use a water pan or is it not needed? 717VRujj4VL._SL1500_.jpg
 

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I have a friend that has two of those. As I recall there is a water pan in there somewhere but it is to extinguish the old smoking biscuit as a new one is brought in. I may be wrong as it's been a while since I saw it in use.
 

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Basically charcoal or wood grills are like hand crank ice cream makers, more effort but well worth the the results.

Gas/propane are easier but like electric ice cream makers, not quite the same.

That said, I have both.
 

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Basically charcoal or wood grills are like hand crank ice cream makers, more effort but well worth the the results.

Gas/propane are easier but like electric ice cream makers, not quite the same.

That said, I have both.
Me too. That said I tend to use propane for the grills and wood/wood pellets for the smokers. One disclaimer, the best hamburger that I ever ate was cooked over mesquite in New Mexico almost 20 years ago. That was special.
 

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I've used charcoal and gas grills to do light smoking over the years. But, nothing beats a wood fire slow smoker. Our Lions Club just smoked 154 slabs of ribs on a custom trailer designed for large scale cooking. It is privately owned by the man who designed and constructed it so most of us would find it overkill. It is similar to the firebox on the side wood smokers so one of those might work for a purist.

The problem with a pure smoker is it works poorly for grilling steaks, hamburgers, hotdogs, chicken, etc. So, you will have to have a regular grill, too. I had a Brinkmann vertical smoke box but it has to be fed charcoal almost constantly because the firebox is too small and the pan is unventilated.

I recently bought a Pit Boss Tailgater wood pellet smoker. It is the same company that makes the Louisiana brand smokers and it VERY similar (copy?) to the Traeger. However, I think the construction is better. Walmart sells them. I get my pellets at Rural King where they offer several single varieties of wood (mesquite, hickory, applewood, etc.). But you may like the hardwood blend that Pit Boss sells. The Tailgater is (as the name suggests) marketed for the camping crowd so you can use it without access to household current. But, I have not tried it. I do find that residue cleanup is easier on the pellet grill because there is a lot less ash than with charcoal or wood. YMMV.

You CAN grill on the Pit Boss. You have a sliding drip pan that allows the firebox to be exposed to the meat grate so you can get 500 degree temps to sear the meat properly. I bought it in the winter and noticed that on cold days for us (35-45 degrees F) with a breeze, it was hard to get up to temperature. Pit Boss makes a blanket for its grills so really cold temperatures are accommodated. Anyway here is a short video that will tell you and show you more about this (and pellet grills in general) grill than I can cover in a few posts.

 

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Best repurposed item I saw used was in ND where a farmer I met had gone to an auction and bought a two-hole outhouse from another farmer. He cleaned it up, repainted it and put it on a concrete slab. Inside he hung his pheasants, beef and pork sausage and used a big tub full of hickory sawdust to basically cold smoke his meat. They were hung over the rafters. Mid week, he would add another 50# sack of hickory sawdust. - pretty neat.
 

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Traeger. Won’t use anything else. Apple is my go to wood. From frozen pizza to brisket. I even figured out how to fry fish on it. Love that slight hint of apple smoke.
 

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Okay, I use wood in my smoker. Smoker needs smoke, smoke adds flavor of the wood, so where does the smoke come from when using electric or gas??
Chip containers that are set near or on burner plates. Want to start an argument in that particular arena? Wet/soaked chips or dry chips? Almost as entertaining as stick shift or automatic transmissions in diesel p/u trucks.
 

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I have a yoder stick burner and use hickory and charcoal in it did 6 slabs of baby back and four chickens for wife birthday tock 6 hours but buddy said it was the best ribs he ever eat he can't stop talker about them ever time I see hem wants help me cook a another batch I told him those were 12 pack ribs, also a Webber charcoal for stakes .
 

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Okay, I use wood in my smoker. Smoker needs smoke, smoke adds flavor of the wood, so where does the smoke come from when using electric or gas??
Chip containers that are set near or on burner plates. Want to start an argument in that particular arena? Wet/soaked chips or dry chips? Almost as entertaining as stick shift or automatic transmissions in diesel p/u trucks.
I never understood the 'wet wood' thing. Steamed wood flavor isn't something I care for. I was doing a brisket and some ribs once and decided it needed some apple. Not having any apple or pear wood, I used a couple apples, quartered and thrown on top of the coals over about an hour or so time span. It worked, I was using mesquite and eucalyptus. That's as close to wet wood I ever got.
 
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