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Discussion Starter #1
I've been casting with a propane burner and lead pot that I cobbled together when I was an out-of-bucks young buck. Now that I'm an old man I was thinking of an electric furnace, with a lever spout like we had when our pistol team used to reload.

My question is, How bad does an electric lead pot make the meter spin? Has any one noticed and impact on the electric bill?

TIA
 

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You won't notice it on your meter. But a furnace will be about 11 times slower than you pot and ladle. I tried a furnace and gave it away. Much much to slow for me so I still use the propane burner with a Lyman ladle. I usually cast with 3-4 molds in rotation. When one mold gets too hot I put it down and go to the next one. My melt and remelt is much faster with the pot. However to each his own and enjoy whichever method you use.
 

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You won't notice it on your meter. But a furnace will be about 11 times slower than you pot and ladle. I tried a furnace and gave it away. Much much to slow for me so I still use the propane burner with a Lyman ladle. I usually cast with 3-4 molds in rotation. When one mold gets too hot I put it down and go to the next one. My melt and remelt is much faster with the pot. However to each his own and enjoy whichever method you use.
I pray you have MAJOR ventilation mate...


Thewelshm
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks,


Do you use a thermometer to regulate heat or have you been winging it as I have?
 

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I like the convenience of a bottom pour casting furnace. I currently use 10 and a 20 pound units. The 10 pound unit is used for small runs of rifle bullets while the 20 pounder is best for large runs of revolver or pistol bullets.

I have a thermometer that came from Lyman, but I've never found it really necessary for casting good bullets.
 

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I have a bottom pour pot for handgun bullets. For the 400-550 gr. rifle bullets for my Sharps and Rolling Block rifles I ladle pour from a large cast iron pot over a propane burner. I tried the bottom pour for those big bullets but it didn't work well. Yes I use a thermometer. When I render wheel weights for ingots, I use an old aluminum pot over a propane burner.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I guess I'll spend the money on more reloading supplies then.

Here's my set-up after the last casting session before cleaning up and putting it away. I do drop the bullets into a bucket of water through a wet towel with a hole in it to prevent splashing.

IMG_0335.jpg
 

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I used a Coleman stove for 30 years, dipping and had no trouble making good bullets...that all changed with I found a used Lyman 20# electric furnace ten years ago...what a difference...problem molds became sweet running and the ease of use doubled my output at a minimum.

I use an RCBS thermometer to keep my casting temp just right for my WW+2% alloy for various molds. Unlike some here and elsewhere, I've never had problems with a leaking spout. I attribute this to using clean saw dust as my fluxing component. I also keep a thick (1/2") layer of saw dust ash on top of my melt...cut's down on the tin loss big time. Best Regards and YMMv Rod
 

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I use the Lee electric, like pouring a drink from the bottom mate, and I quench them, job done...

Thewelshm
 
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