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The Death of this forum is highly overated... :mrgreen:
That said, I have been busy this Summer putting together a collection of Maine period artifacts and reproductions to represent the Long Hunter period of Middle Maine...The piece below belongs to that collection.

The Capote (French for "cape") was commonly made from a wool trade blanket. Typical of the style used by the Plains Indians and the Mountain men of the Northern Fur trade. The one I'm showing is not a modern one. It was part of a collection from Northern Maine. Most likely Canadian. It has no Hudson or Whitney blanket parts. It is a very heavy garment, and 100% Wool. Full of burn holes and some moth damage, it is nonetheless...the pride of my collection of period garments. ;)

There are some nice features to it. It is hooded. All the buttons are solid antler horn sewn with sinew. Every bit of it is hand stitched. I am missing the sash, but plan on making one if I can find a matching piece of blanket. Most folks are used to seeing these made from trade blankets, but I find this one just as attractive in it's use of material...

Had to get one of the grand-rug-rats to model it. She's 5-8 and still it hangs on her. Must have been made for a big man. I'm no shrinking violet and it barely fits me......





giz
 

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She looks thrilled, Giz. :mrgreen:

A very nice example to see. Frankly, I am surprised at the 2 (or 3?) toned nature of the jacket. I would have thought they would just used all the same color material.

You sure that didn't come from Freeport? :D
 

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That is very cool, around what year to you think it was made?
 
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Shaun,

Actually, what impressed me most about the Capote was the make-up of different blankets. Typically a Hudson bay 3 Pointer was made into one with enough material to do a rifle sleeve. Maybe some mittens. The one in the pic is made from three different blankets and is not bright colored like the Hudson or Whitney's. Much more subdued and good for hunting. I have a green wool period correct shirt and hand covers to go with it. Also a Whitney blanket formed to cover it in colder weather. Put all the pieces together and you'll be toasty warm on the bitterest days.

Hunter,

I think this what I'd call very early second period. Perhaps when muzzleloading and it's history was rediscovered in the 1930's to 50's.

giz
 
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