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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need a solid recommendation on a tent that I can stand up in put all my essential camping gear it that's decently well made. I need enough room to set up cots, I can put ply wood down for the legs to not rip a whole threw it. Ill be using it some not a bunch, it can't cost a lot of money. Needs to be water proof wind proof all that good stuff. thanks in advance.
Hopefully I can get a good recommendation.
 

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Not a lot of jack and quality don't fit together at all in my view. You want a good wall tent, you'll pay for it, no way around that. The ones Cabelas offers are excellent but the price of admission is high. I used a Eureka Timberline for years but that is at best a 2 person tent, not a wall tent. Hillerberg also makes quality tents (wall tents too) but again, the price is substantial.
 

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Try the Holiday Inn. I only camp where there’s a lobby these days.
I wish. Most of the hunts I go on (outfitter guided) are base camp hunts with wall tents that have a wood stove. Just like a motel but you sleep in your mummy bag and crap in a hole.:D
 

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I wish. Most of the hunts I go on (outfitter guided) are base camp hunts with wall tents that have a wood stove. Just like a motel but you sleep in your mummy bag and crap in a hole.:D
Yea, but on those guided hunts do you have to dig your own hole?

I don't tent camp anymore. I just got too old. There are lots of tents out there from many manufacturers. The better ones don't come cheap. What I always found helpful was to go to a store like REI or Cabelas and talk to one of the sales people. Tell them what you are going to use it for and what you want it to do. See what they recommend. I used to do that with sleeping bags too.
 

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Yea, but on those guided hunts do you have to dig your own hole?

I don't tent camp anymore. I just got too old. There are lots of tents out there from many manufacturers. The better ones don't come cheap. What I always found helpful was to go to a store like REI or Cabelas and talk to one of the sales people. Tell them what you are going to use it for and what you want it to do. See what they recommend. I used to do that with sleeping bags too.
For what I pay I'd better not....lol

I've found that usually I know more than the 'sales associates' at Cabelas know. No REI around here but I've had the same experience at Bass Pro, Gander and Fin Feather and Fur.

Far as sleeping bags go, I'm a Kuiu person. I have a Kuiu mummy bag that set me back 600 bucks that does everything but rub me to sleep.... (I typed that right)... Good to 30 below. All my hunting duds are Kuiu as well and my rifle stocks are hydrocoated in Kuiu camo. I like continuity.
 

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Far as sleeping bags go, I'm a Kuiu person. I have a Kuiu mummy bag that set me back 600 bucks that does everything but rub me to sleep.... (I typed that right)... Good to 30 below. All my hunting duds are Kuiu as well and my rifle stocks are hydrocoated in Kuiu camo. I like continuity.
I was not familiar with the Kuiu brand. I assume that it arrived on the scene after my time. I did look them up. They seem to have good stuff at fairly reasonable, not extortionate, prices. Although my camping these days is done in a motorhome, I am still a jacket junkie.
 

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I've had a lot of tents over the years, and have become picky about them. I use two tents - a 3 person North Face 4 season for Winter, and a 3 person Eureka for warmer seasons. Regardless, the most important things are plenty of ventilation, and a floor that extends at least 4 inches up the sides of the walls. Without the ventilation you'll get more rain (condensation) inside than outside - even when it's not raining. The high floors will keep out both high water and critters. A footprint (I use two) is a must. For ease of set up, I prefer hooks rather than sleeves, and fiberglass. A large rain fly is a god-send in any weather. If it's never stored wet or damp, most tents will last several years, but you definitely get what you pay for. Now, I got the camping bug again !! Thanks.
 

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OP.
A tale of two tents.
1. Blue and yellow tent. 10X12, $200, made of nylon, flimsy fiberglass poles, blows around in the breeze, sun roof window is screen only, wind blows sand, rain, and snow under the fly and into the tent. Weighs 25 lbs. Suitable for temperate season use. Good for 4-5 years at best. UV rays from sunshine deteriorate nylon. Easy for one person to set up. I have used several tents of this type, I will never buy another one.




2. Tan tent. 10X14, $800, made of canvas, sturdy 1 inch steel poles, does not care about the weather, tent, fly, poles and ground stakes weigh 100 lbs. 10 years and going strong, sunshine caused the tent to fade in color. Not easy for one person to set up. I have used this type of tent for a long time and will never HAVE to buy another one. Longest time set up was 3 weeks for a quail hunt. Lived in comfort.
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" How else would you do it ":D


thewelshm
 

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Wish I could help. My idea of camping out and roughing it is a motel without HBO or Wifi....
 

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Bill has it right.

We used to tent camp a lot, and I've had both the same styles that he writes about. His advice is spot on. Great for when you're young(er).

Now we "camp" in a 34' 5th wheel. Has a king size bed, I can stand up anywhere inside, indoor plumbing, heat, A/C, full kitchen and comfortable seating.
 

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I have and have used with great success in many different weather conditions, Cabela’s guide series geodesic tents. They put up with snow, wind, and rain. 6’3” in the center lets most people stand up. I run a propane heater. A 20 lb. tank lasts 4 days running it at night. I have a “tree” that allows a lantern to sit on top for light. Two people on cots and their gear can be very comfortable.

I’ve slept in the back of my truck, backpack tents, wall tents, the aforementioned Cabela’s tent, slide in truck campers, and a fifth wheel.

With the exception of the two styles of hard sided campers, I liked the Cabela’s tent the best.
 

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Sissies!! Back when I was in college (Military college) many moons ago, friends and I would go camping. Rule 1 - Nothing has the word "Coleman" on it - NOTHING!! Each person had a poncho. Snapped together for the tent. Unsnapped if it started raining. Carried in on back everything and carried everything out. No trash left behind. Surprising what you don't need when you have to carry it aways i.e. more than car to campsite 15 feet away.

Now in my wiser years, I am thiking about the tent that attaches to my Honda CR-V and we could sleep in the car. Sighs.
 
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