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Discussion Starter #1
I was reading up on the 95 Chilean Mauser serial numbers. My little rifle is an A serial number. As I understand it,
my rifle was in the first 10,000 delivered. The stock is so worn I can't make out any #s on the stock. The metal
matches except for the sight and the cleaning rod. The rod was cleaned and no #s can be seen. Here is the carbine.
Cliff image.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Don, did my misspelling change the looks of the rifle. Glad you have assumed the duty of official spellchecker. Do I need to submit drafts of my posts to you for editing.
Cliff
 

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Cliff, it had me puzzled. "Cavalry" as a descriptive term for a rifle would be unsurprising; but "Calvary", being a religious term, would be unusual and for that reason I asked my question. It seemed to me a matter of potentially considerable interest.
 

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CPTKILLER, you noted, "We former Cav guys are sensitive about that." As I am foreigner, some of the abbreviations used on this site are unfamiliar to me. What does the abbreviation "Cav" stand for? Perhaps "cavalry?"
 

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Very nice rifle Cliff. Is the bayonet matched to the rifle also? How does it shoot? Would like to know. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
image.jpeg The bayo doesn't match. Curt, I got it thrown in with the rifle. It looks a lot better with the 95 rifle of mine. It's a shame the bolts were mixed up before the rifles were imported. The carbine is an A block, first 10,000 shipped. The bayo and the rifle are
H block. Cliff
 

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Hey Cliff. I have an old Steyr Model 95 Carbine that I picked up back in the early 90's when surplus was at dang near give away prices.
This one will beat the living daylights out of you when you shoot it...sure is a lot of fun though.;) I can't believe what they want for these
today:eek:. I lucked out on some ammo a while back when a fellow came into the lgs and said that he had some 8mm ammo for sale on
clips..it was 8x56r not 8mm and I gave him $20 for the whole batch. You cant beat the old surplus for value..it's still out there, you just
have to search. Here's a pic of my Steyr 95 and the ammo that I mentioned.

100_1462.jpg
100_1103.jpg
100_1106.jpg
 

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CPTKILLER, you noted, "We former Cav guys are sensitive about that." As I am foreigner, some of the abbreviations used on this site are unfamiliar to me. What does the abbreviation "Cav" stand for? Perhaps "cavalry?"
CAV is short for the military term, and not the hill where Christ was crucified.
Best to you sir for your asking!
 

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Calvary or cavalry? If indeed "Calvary," why is the rifle thus named?
Hey Don Luigi, I don't think anyone ever really got to the root of your question.
I am by no means a historian on older battle rifles but I believe the Cavalry designation stemmed from the need of mounted troops needing a shorter rifle that was more nimble on horse back. Often they had different sling swivels on them so they could be strapped on differently.
The same parameters evolved the "Engineer carbine" later used by gun crews and troops not really dedicated to the front lines.
So basically they are shorter versions of the main issued battle rifle.
 

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Is your "Cavalry" (if you ain't Cav... You ain't $hit) carbine in the original caliber or is it one of the Chilean conversions to 7.62 NATO? I was stationed in a couple of South American countries in my military career and I saw thousands of these still in the armories just rusting into the floors.

I might note that many short rifles in South America were also issued to engineers as well as various police units.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Schuetze, both of my old rifles are still chambered in 7mm Mauser. A lot of the later Argentina rifles were changed over so they would sell better here in the states. My old rifles look a little rough but the barrels are in very good condition.
Cliff
 

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Cliff, it had me puzzled. "Cavalry" as a descriptive term for a rifle would be unsurprising; but "Calvary", being a religious term, would be unusual and for that reason I asked my question. It seemed to me a matter of potentially considerable interest.
Whatever they're paying you to be the official spell checker it probably isn't enough.:D
 

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The Cavalry rifle was so named because of its shorter barrel. and side mounted sling which sat higher of the mounted cavalry soldiers shoulders. Thus the stocks did not beat the horse to death. The gun could be un-slung while riding mounted also. It was also some what lighter so the mounted soldier could dis-mount with the gun being held in one hand.
 

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Hey Don Luigi, I don't think anyone ever really got to the root of your question.
I am by no means a historian on older battle rifles but I believe the Cavalry designation stemmed from the need of mounted troops needing a shorter rifle that was more nimble on horse back. Often they had different sling swivels on them so they could be strapped on differently.
The same parameters evolved the "Engineer carbine" later used by gun crews and troops not really dedicated to the front lines.
So basically they are shorter versions of the main issued battle rifle.
Read my post also.. !!
 
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