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Kevin Keith mentioned it in another post. Does everyone have one ready to go? I was trying to put a couple together and wanted some suggestions on what to get and what not to. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance. James
 
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Mine are always packed and ready for the time of year...

But I always felt it was more important to have a plan as to where you'll go. In my case, not far. So what's important to me are supplies. What's important to someone trying to travel a good distance will be personal safety items, food, medical supplies, personal hygiene, cash, and defensive tools.

giz
 

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Giz gave you a good common sense answer; my personal take is...if you're gonna have one, keep it simple and easy to carry and gear it to the current season (summer, winter etc.). kfjdrfirii

Some people totally obsess on this subject and it has brought the "Tin Foil Hat" squad out of the wood work on more that one gun forum.

Try to steer clear of this Zombie squad; they'll have you seeing terrorist & serial killers behind every bush. kubvcabo
 

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I worry about a place to bug out to. I live in a desert that I did not grow up in and have yet to find any one into heading out into it and surviving in it. I have talked to a few piaute indians that have given me some information about the desert and there advice is go out in it now and learn your way around it or dont go there and die.
I have been out in it a few times and it is a wilderness of its own and very tough to live in when your talking living off the land.The diet you would eat is very un appealing and water is a serious problem as well as trying to stay undetected. There are no trees in the desert for the most part and any where there are would be a hey come look here in these trees where I am holed up.
In mid summer it takes about three gallons of water to hike a day in it or you risk heat stroke.Some one skilled in living in the desert could definately do well in it though I think.
Un fortunately I dont posses those skills that take years of learning and lots of time out in it.
 

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I have one in the trunk of the company car. My 30 yr old son got me going in this direction. Seems the kids have had these for a while.
I travel in huge cities and if we have an earthquake and the roads get FUBAR I may have to walk home,
but I will have to ditch the shirt and tie and assume the look of a semi homeless person.

http://www.exxcess.info/bugoutbag.aspx
 
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Sometime when your out woodswalking for a day....take your git kit with you and use as much of the stuff in there as you can. I have a Traglia alcohol stove and bring food to cook. I practice making fire with my kit...Draw stream water with my filtration system....Map and compass/clinometer get used.

You get the drift. Some of this stuff works so well it's now in my huntin' bag, too... ;)

All this resides in a high-end hiking pack, with a camelback that is intergrated into the pack. Lots of storage, lots of pockets... Same one I use hiking up the mountains around here...

giz
 

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Probably the most important question is.......where will I "bug-out" to ? Do you choose the woods or the suburbs ? Right now, at home, I could go to the "Mount Tom State Park" with a walk out my backdoor, and a short 1/2 mile walk. Maybe I should go farther? Who knows! I wouldn't be far from home, so I could return for supplies, on occasion. (Or maybe to use the bathroom!!! :lol: ) A guy could stay there for weeks, undetected, if he kept moving at night!

I have to confess that I don't have a "bug-out" bag. I live about 10 miles "as the crow flies" from Westover Reserve Air Force Base. It is one of the prime "staging points" for operations in the Mid-East and Europe. The planes were really busy around here during the IRAQ Wars 1 and 2. It was used alot during WWII, also.

That "fact" probably makes it a prime target area for missle attack!!! I don't think I'm far enough away to not be affected directly by Nukes. My area could be wiped out in minutes. So.....what's the point of "bugging out"? Luckily, I'm North-West. The prevailing Westerlies might carry the "fall-out" to the East. (My Mom lives 1/2 mile East of Westover. YIKES!!! :eek: )

I guess I get in my truck....and head west, to the Berkshires, if I can. I do have a minimum of stuff in the truck cap, including bottled water, snack bars, a hiking kit in a knapsack, and a sleeping bag. I could make my truck my traveling headquarters. Just have to grab some guns and ammo, and head out for a few days, anyway. :roll: Bob
 

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Hey onenut58, make your way down to my "man cave"...its close to the lake and the Colorado river, plenty of water. Also, if the sh*t really hits the fan, we can sit around and drain the 15 gallon keg in my kegerator then kiss our azzes goodbye!!! :lol:
 

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It's interesting that this subject came up. I'm trying to put one together too and came up with the same questions.. what really is necessary, and what's 'too much'.

I agree it's important to have a plan and to know where you're going. But, how about some more ideas on what to put in the back pack..

Giz, I noticed you're talking about an alcohol stove. I've been looking at those and wondered if they would work well. I guess they do. What do you carry with you for fuel? Denatured alcohol or something else?

Great idea for a thread, by the way. Thanks for bringing it up, James.
 

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Among other things a paper copy of the Delorme Gazetteer is pretty handy and doesn't weigh much..... I think that the latest issues with topographic details are available for every state.... don't depend upon your GPS working and if it does, it may work both ways....
 
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carl418 said:
Giz, I noticed you're talking about an alcohol stove. I've been looking at those and wondered if they would work well. I guess they do. What do you carry with you for fuel? Denatured alcohol or something else?
Denatured works the best....

Isopropyl(normally 70% alcohol to 30% water). This is used for medical purposes (for external use only!). The water will lessen the amount of heat generated, but it will still work fine with the Trangia burner.

Booze, over-proof rum for instance would work also, but: it's expensive and it's a darn waste! :mrgreen:

giz
 

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Actually you can get 91% ISP if you look. Burns alot cleaner with more heat and less residue. I think you need booze that's 80 Proof or more to burn.

But to me, the best stove is the Optimus 8R which runs on unleaded gas. These stoves are handy, effective and rugged. I've had one since the early 70's. There's one in my BOB (Bug Out Bag)....
 

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What size back pack are y'all using? I'm looking at some hiking back packs and they're in the 40 to 80 liter capacity.

Is that too big? too small?
 

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carl418 said:
What size back pack are y'all using? I'm looking at some hiking back packs and they're in the 40 to 80 liter capacity.

Is that too big? too small?
That would be in OUNCES. I just bought my wife a backpack with a 70oz container. They usually run 70-100 ounces. DO NOT use juice or other in the bag or you will have a science project. There are tablets that runners etc. use to make hydrating solution or use plain water.We got ours at REI
SHhhh don't tell her its a bug out bag.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
As far as fire starting goes does everyone carry lighters or matches or both? I have lighters and some firesteel but I haven't tried to start a fire with the steel yet. Also it requires carbon steel to spark it. I tried stainless and it just made a rub mark on my knife. A buddy of mine can start it with the steel and some wood shavings. I have seen those little fuel sticks, are they ok to store for a while or would it be hazardous?
 

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thomashoward said:
carl418 said:
What size back pack are y'all using? I'm looking at some hiking back packs and they're in the 40 to 80 liter capacity.

Is that too big? too small?
That would be in OUNCES. I just bought my wife a backpack with a 70oz container. They usually run 70-100 ounces. DO NOT use juice or other in the bag or you will have a science project. There are tablets that runners etc. use to make hydrating solution or use plain water.We got ours at REI
SHhhh don't tell her its a bug out bag.
thomashoward,
I think we're talking about two different things. What I'm referring to is the capacity of the pack.

I've seen some packs that have the capability of storing water and those do show differing amounts of water.

But, the packs themselves are listed by size. Some are listed in cubic inches and some are in liters.

For instance, this one is listed as 5400 cubic inches:
http://www.shopbags.com/Backpacking-Packs/Western-Pack-Hiking-Backpack.asp?aff=5108

By the way, personally I think this is too big. But, that's what I'm asking about. What do y'all say?
 

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Carl the size of your pack is going to be determined by what you want in it. The main thing to take into account is how far you want to go and how fast.The pack in your pic is a large one and would be very slow going with it.A pack is just like packing a gun in a holster.The heavier it is the more its gonna slow you down.You fill a back pack in your living room and pick it up with one hand and it feels not to bad. You forget that 40 pounds feels like 140 after you hike a few miles.
The pack in the pic you posted could be easily loaded up to 70 pounds or more.
How long you plan on being gone and how long your staying and what is where your going determines whats in your pack.I would suggest you surf around and find a alice pack. I carried one in the army and stole mine out of my ta 50 when I was supposed to turn it in.
They have a small aluminum pack board that is padded and shaped to get the weight up on your shoulders and mould to your back well where you dont need to belt them to your waist also.They have rubber bags that protect your belongings and can be used for floatation. The straps are extra long where you can lash down a sleeping bag etc. The sides have web where you can clip on canteens and other things.
Mine had many miles on it before a nephew conned me out of it when I moved to nevada.It still looked new they are extremely durable.They also have a quick release on one of the pack straps you can reach up and pull and drop the pack quick in a emergency like needing to run or falling into a hard current in a river etc.
I have done a lot of back packing long distances for extended periods in the woods and the main thing I do is go as light as possible.Every little pound adds up when your hoofing it along with your pack straps digging into your shoulders. I try to keep my weight down to about forty pounds personaly and stay close to streams for fish and carry a wrist rockett for grouse etc
 

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http://www.armynavydeals.com/asp/produc ... =2252&ST=2
Carl here is the medium alice pack I am suggesting.

Here is a the stove I like to use. When I was in the army when we went to the field in germany which was all the time. I figured out in the three years I was there a year and a half was spent in the field broken up of course.The old timers always kept alert and field food.They also introduced me to the sterno stove. Many times we had to eat c rations for a couple weeks at a time and C rats got old real quick.
The old c rats you could take every thing out cut a x in the side of the box take a p-38 and make a couple wholes in one of the c rats cans and stuff back in all the small card board packing in the box and light it on fire. It would warm the eggs and ham or meat and potatoes etc buy the time it burned down.
But c rats were nasty unless a you got a b-3 with the pound cake etc.Any way a GI will figure out short cuts in a hurry and seek good food and booze and plenty of good sleep as much as possible because the army dont think any of those things are nessasary.
Right in the px they sold these sterno stoves and they are super light weight folds out in seconds and sterno heats canned food pretty fast.It is smokeless and burns clean. I have used these many many times.


http://www.baproducts.com/p62.htm
 
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