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I have a .44 H.E. that is nickle plated with brown S&W grips. All the numbers are 7 with the Roman numeral VII scratched inside the right hand grip. On the receiver is a Z with a star above it and the number 23 just below that. The same Z and star is marked on the barrel and the front of the cyclinder. Also on the front of the cyclinder is the letters ELG in an oval. The barrel markings are one line that reads Smith & Wesson Springfield Mass. Patents Ap 5,55 Jul 6 .59 Nov 24 .63. It has a 7 stamped on the bottom of the barrel, a 7 on the barrel latch and a 7 inside the receiver flat as well as an N. It has a lanyard ring on the bottom of the butt. Can anyone help identify this pistol? Also the extractor cam appears to be worn out and does anyone know where I can get a good one? Would a cam from a .38 H.E. work?
 

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Grits, Welcome to the Forum. From your description, I can say you probably have one of the various copies of the S&W .44HE made in Europe, prior to WW2. The ELG is the Belgian proof mark, indicating the gun was proof tested at the Liege, Belgium proof house, although that does not necessarilly mean it was made in Belgium, as other makers in European counties used rhe Belgian proof services. Many of these copies were marked with S&W's name and patent dates to fool unsuspecting buyers. Parts for these gun are pretty much non-existant. Fitting a S&W part to the gun might be possible but probably more expensive than the gun is worth. Ed.
 

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opoefc, Thanks for the info. I'm hoping I might be able to find a .44 or .38 H.E that is a junker and scrounge the ejector cam. I like this old hogleg and shoot it with .44 S&W but hate having to shake the cartrige cases out or punch them out with a piece of dowel.
 

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I'd like to see a photo.
 

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Grits, You might try this: Take the gun apart and remove the extractor parts, (cam, star, extractor rod, springs, etc )and give everything a good cleaning and soaking. A gun as old as yours probably has lots of old dirt, grease, crud, etc. inside of it. You may find that things work OK after that, if not you can see exactly what parts are worn, broken, or otherwise not doing their job. If the teeth on the cams are broken, a small weld job is not that costly and then cut new teeth with a small file. Good luck, Ed.
 
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