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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really like how clean my brass comes out wet tumbling. I bought the big drum when I ordered my tumbler and it works excellent. I have enough brass for each caliber that I shoot regularly to shoot all summer and then tumble in the fall for winter reloading. The problem was the calibers that I don't shoot often or only have one or two hundred pieces of brass for. I just acquired 250 .32 H&R Magnum cases and want to clean and load them. I built this small drum out of a 12" piece of 4" ABS and some 1 1/2" PVC for the paddles. So far so good.
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That’s a cement mixer mate. :)

Thewelshm
 

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I really like how clean my brass comes out wet tumbling. I bought the big drum when I ordered my tumbler and it works excellent. I have enough brass for each caliber that I shoot regularly to shoot all summer and then tumble in the fall for winter reloading. The problem was the calibers that I don't shoot often or only have one or two hundred pieces of brass for. I just acquired 250 .32 H&R Magnum cases and want to clean and load them. I built this small drum out of a 12" piece of 4" ABS and some 1 1/2" PVC for the paddles. So far so good. View attachment 534259 View attachment 534260 View attachment 534261
I believe the only thing I'd change is how you have the paddles attached inside to the drum. Think I'd loose the threaded metal bolts and nuts (because they will dint the cases) and replace them with Rivnuts and flat heat screws. I don't pay much attention to the amount of cases I tumble in STS, I've tumbled 50 before. My only thing I watch is mixing calibers where the cases can nestle inside each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The screws did bother me when I built it but I can build another for less than $10 if I don't like this one. Just finished 250 .32 H&R Magnum cases. I'm calling this a success. What looks like dents are water droplets. I looked over the brass pretty thoroughly and didn't see any dents from the screws.
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I borrow the wife's oven and force dry them in it at 175 degrees. I rarely get any water drioplets, I use Lemishine which causes the water to 'sheet' off.

Been think hard about a Thumlers Tumbler lately. The drum on my Farakfort tumbler isn't big enough for big jobs.
 
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I borrow the wife's oven and force dry them in it at 175 degrees. I rarely get any water drioplets, I use Lemishine which causes the water to 'sheet' off.

Been think hard about a Thumlers Tumbler lately. The drum on my Farakfort tumbler isn't big enough for big jobs.
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This is what Jerry M. uses.....
 

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Obviously Jerry isn't to concerned with case dings (I've seen that video as well as the one where he uses an old junk stove to dry them) cement mixers have metal paddles and metal (steel paddles) will most certainly dent brass cases and deform case mouths as the tumble around in the drum

Not for me. My cases must be dent free and no issues with case mouth's either.

Too big anyway. The Thumlers large barrel tumbler is quite large enough I suspect.
 

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Myself, I'm way more concerned with dented cases which is why a cement mixer don't work for me and BTW, I have one.
 

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That's cool. Looks like you are gearing it down a couple times. Once with the belt pulleys and again where your "turner" drives the PVC pipe. What RPM would you say the pipe spins at?
 

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That's a BiggDawg tumbler isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes it is. I’m thinking you turned be on to them years ago when you bought one for your employer at the time.
 

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Yes it is. I’m thinking you turned be on to them years ago when you bought one for your employer at the time.
That's what I thought. I tried to look them up, and they're no longer in business. It's sad, because they're a really well built tumbler. Probably the best medium volume tumblers ever built.
 

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Lots of people went out of business in the last year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Macdadx5 your question peaked my curiosity but I wasn't sure how to find the RPM of the container. Then I remembered buying a photo tach for working on old engines. I braved the cold and snow and made the trip out to the garage to retrieve it. Some fresh batteries and a warm up session in the house and your question has been answered. The small 4" drum turns at 44 RPM.
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Dang, you didn't have to do all that for me! I went back and read original post. Sounds like it was made for a large drum and you home made your small PVC drum for short runs. I figured it must not be spinning too fast or it would walk right off there. Very cool setup. I just use about a 20 yo dry media tumbler that I think I bought from Midway. Works I guess, the wet tumbling seems like a better way to go.
 
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