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Must have really been bored this Winter. I miss shooting my BPCR's. I really don't like to take them out in the cold weather. But I really miss reloading for them.

So I picked up the Handi Rifle in 22 Hornet, with the intent of trying to squeek out every bit of accuracy the gun has to offer. The dealer that had it is a friend. He sold the gun to the original owner. Pretty much a non-reloading type and the gun came back quickly ~ as soon as the guy realized how expensive factory fodder is... :mrgreen:

Ah...the advantages of reloading. I have about 300 rounds of reloaded brass that good friend sold me. Will be busy shooting that off... ;)

Going to apply the same rigorous reloading routine that I use in the BPCR's and see if that effects group sizes. Never tried this in a smokeless powder cartridge before. The NEF is a perfect little platform single shot for the experiments.

So it's off to the range to sight it in the new scope using some reloads. I intend to get together two or three types of brass, weigh them, and index them. Next week, we'll see if we can use the indexed reloads to start a baseline of measurements.

Something to do and look forward to each week.... ;)
 

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Bored has nothing to do with it. Extracting the best a gun has to offer has everything to do with it.
I found about half a box of Sellor and Bellot Hornet brass :( , still looking for more
 
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I intend to do a lightening job to it. I will polish up everthing but the sear area as it currently breaks like ice... ;) On my Lyman gauge it breaks at just under 5 lbs. Not enough for me to worry about while shooting from a rest. I'll most likely bring it down to just under 3lbs ~ hunting trigger weight.



Giz
 

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Hey Giz, What do you mean by "indexing" the brass? Is it just using that particular bras in that gun only?
 
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Shaun,
Indexing insures that any imperfections in your cartridge are introduced into your rifle’s chamber the same way each time. It’s nothing more than orienting your case in your case sizing die and your loaded cartridge into your chamber the same way each time.

Basically, it means making an indexing mark on the brass rim that will correspond to one made on the reloading press base. Then when you do the various reloading steps you keep these two marks lined up ~at each stages of reloading. When you go to load the single shot cartridge rifle, you then insert the brass with the indexing mark on the rim facing 12 noon in the chamber. What this does is eliminate some of the variables in your reloaded cartridges and makes any minor variances equal out....

Kinda keeps the willy-nilliness out of the process...

Basically, we're trying to reload each time in a highly consistant manner.

Of course all of the above only considers the brass...and bullets need to be indexed as well...but that is another topic ;)

giz
 

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Gizamo said:
Nice rig! ...very glad you don't have the trigger problem many owners of these rifles have!

I'm such an old-style single shot rifle nut, I'm trying to figure out how to talk you into shooting lead pills in it!

I've never cast a tiny .22 Hornet bullet, but I have cast tiny bullets for .25-20SS in several rifles - a Low Wall, and a 1882 Maynard - with great success. I've also tried casting for my .243 - with OK results! I bet that Hornet would really like lead slugs!

I probably wouldn't go so far as to breech-seat the bullets ahead of the case, and would likely focus on fixed ammo with a gas check design bullet to maximize velocity for longer range use.

Wringing out a new SS rifle is lots of fun, and you are on track for top accuracy! Good Luck!

The cost of jacketed hunting rifle bullets, of any caliber, makes me blanch anytime I do a price check. I'm thinking about a thread on loading cast bullets in rifles for low-cost practice... and hunting, too.

xtm
 
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Well Guys,

It goes like this. Went to the range today and sighted in the new scope. Made about a half dozen adjustments at 25 then 50 yards. Ranged it out to 100. Couple of more shots to get it in the X-ring. Cleaned the gun, then sent a fouling shot down into the berm. Then shot for group only. First string of 3 were sub 1/2" MOA....cleaned the gun and did it again ~ a dime covered the group! The third time wasn't the charm, but it managed to be covered handily by a quarter.

H 4227 at 10.5 grains, Sierra 40 grain 1100's, OAL was 1.723 and trim was 1.393

I expect that once we weigh some brass and index reload it ~ all those flyers will dissappear from those huge groups. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

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You missed a point in the description of "Indexing".... the mark on your case should be in the same place on all of the cases you use. I used to notch the rims of my Remington .45-70s on the "-" in the R-P. That give you a little more of a handle on the vargaries of how the Factory Draw Dies were working at the time of their manufacture.

Nice Hornet Giz.... I'll have to bring down my H&R .22 Jet for a little shoot off.... but I've not reloaded for it yet.... cast bullet, jacketed or otherwise.....

Drew
 
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Drew, please do... :)

Was a perfect day to shoot at the club. Warmed up nicely and no wind. Think everyone was kicked back and enjoying the warmer weather. Everyone's shooting was a notch better without all the shivering ;)

First Handi-Rifle I've owned, and so far it is impressive. Considering that they are very inexpensive, it's nice to see the accuracy. The trigger does need lightening and that is a must do. However, it breaks very clean. I wonder if the factory is still offering the additional barrel program. They use to do a trigger job at no cost if you were getting additional barrels fitted.

giz
 
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