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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,
The Bodyguard in question is new. I've only had it a few weeks and I'm thinking of trying to return it.
The problem is that the cylinder doesn't always rotate when I cold fire it. It seems to me that there's something really wrong with that. Whether loaded or unloaded, the cylinder should turn regardless of how it goes back into firing position, shouldn't it? I mean what the hell? If I'm in a life-threatening situation (which seems easier to get into more and more these days), I don't want to have to think about whether it's going to fire on the first pull or not. What if it doesn't?
Something I read about the star on the ejector not matching up with it's female counterpart. But so what? Shouldn't they just catch together and rotate the cylinder? Is this not a major defect?
I have yet to take it to a range because I'm not sure if I should return it or not.
I have a 686+ and it's a tank. Very surprising to find this Bodyguard acting strange.
Thanks for reading.
Edit: I just checked the receipt and it's not returnable. But if it's defective, I need to resolve this somehow.
 

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Call Smith & Wesson service Dept and they will send you a return label. They will get it fixed. No, it shouldn’t be doing what you are describing.
 

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Welcome to the forum! I second the advice given by TennSharpshooter, they should be able to help.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

It sounds like it is not working normally or properly, and will not serve you as a personal defense firearm.

Contact Smith and Wesson's customer service and describe the problem. They should send you a factory return label and should resolve the problem by inspecting it, identifying what's causing the problem and repairing it.

It isn't necessary to make an emotional argument with them, they are normally quite responsible and good to deal with.

Most stores will not accept return of a firearm because of numerous legal issues. Don't hold that against your dealer.
 
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the cylinder should turn regardless of how it goes back into firing position, shouldn't it?
No it shouldn't. Whenever you close a revolver cylinder, you MUST rotate it until the cylinder lock clicks into place. If that's not a habit already, make it one. If you are doing that, then give S&W a call. The last revolver I sent for repair was returned in 11 days, so it's not too painful.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No it shouldn't. Whenever you close a revolver cylinder, you MUST rotate it until the cylinder lock clicks into place. If that's not a habit already, make it one. If you are doing that, then give S&W a call. The last revolver I sent for repair was returned in 11 days, so it's not too painful.
Yes, of course. It clicks in place and is unable to rotate yet sometimes it won't turn when trigger is pulled. Good to hear about the turnaround time.

I'm calling tomorrow. Will keep you updated. Thanks to all who replied.
 

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Yes, of course. It clicks in place and is unable to rotate yet sometimes it won't turn when trigger is pulled. Good to hear about the turnaround time.

I'm calling tomorrow. Will keep you updated. Thanks to all who replied.
If the cylinder is locked in the correct place (as you say), then the hand is not engaging the ratchet star. Two things come to mind: 1) the trigger is not rebounding to the full forward position. 2) The hand is not returning to the forward position in the shell plate window.

For #1, try pushing the trigger forward to see if the hand then catches and rotates the cylinder on the subsequent pull. If it does, the problem is likely the rebound slide. Since it works most of the time (?), my guess is that the rebound slide needs a little polishing. You can do this by disassembly OR by dry firing a thousand or so times. If dry fire worries you, put a cleaning path between the hammer and frame if the hammer is exposed. Be sure to push the trigger fully forward each time you dry fire the revolver. Dry firing doesn't bother me and all of my revolvers, except the newest, have 10,000+ firing cycles on them. Dry firing will also polish your trigger stroke.

#2, The hand is mounted by a pivot pin to the trigger. It has a spring that holds it forward in the window. So there could be an issue with the hand not pivoting smoothly on the trigger (burr) or there could be an issue with the spring or the hand-to-window fit could be tight. Again a few thousand cycles will help smooth any action irregularities that may exist. If it's the spring, it has to come apart.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@ButterSmooth The trigger didn't push forward. I began pulling trigger but gave up after about 200 pulls. It's ALL on S&W. I appreciate your expertise.

I sent it back to S&W. Was initially told "3 to 4 weeks" but now I'm told "6 to 8 weeks."

The CS person said she would try to expedite after I complained a little. It's brand new, not user-related.
 
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