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I'm getting ready to strip down an old High Standard Double Nine. It's a 1967 model. The frame is aluminum, and the cylinder and barrel are blued steel. Question: Has anyone tried Birchwood Casey products, such as the Liquid Gun Blue and Aluminum Black? And do they work? Or do you know of something better to use that is simple? I've already brought the grips back to life. It's an accurate straight shooter, but I'm not going to spend a fortune on this one. Thanks for any ideas and help.

 

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I had one just like that my ex took when she flew the coop because I bought it from her dad.I tireed the birch wood casey stuff on a winchester barrel a few years ago and wasnt to pleased with it. Its not a deep blue and it stinks for ever.I dont know about the aluminum.You might try some of that bake paint from brownells.For blueing the steel, best stuff I found is blue wonder gun blue.I am not much of a photographer but I did this high power with it and was super pleased with the results. The slide is factory blue the frame is the blue wonder.

 

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hc,
The 'aluminum black' is powerful stuff, and can do a good job on an alloy frame,
BUT...
Surface prep is even more critical than when bluing steel.
NO finger marks, NO oils, NO remaining old finish, then redo it AGAIN.
Here's a possible problem, though...
The alloy compounds used by different makers often 'take' the blacking solution differently.
Good to experiment on the inside of a triggerguard.
If there is any contaminant on the aluminum surface you're going to black, the matte-black finish will wipe right off.
A semi-gloss finish with 'micro-pits/graining' will hold the finish well.
Good luck!
Don
;)
 
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