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Discussion Starter #1
I have a little stash of ammo .38 special, 38+ps and 357 for my 66-2. Not wanting to shoot any of my brass cased 357's yesterday, I bought some 357 aluminum cased ammo at Academy. Anybody tried this? It shot ok...but I had to "press" the rounds in the chambers, then had to use a screwdriver handle to to the ejector rod to eject the spent casings, as they swelled in the chambers. Smelly, dirty shooting too. If you haven't tried it...I don't reccomend it. Just my experience. :x
 

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Do you have any carbon build up in the cylinder from firing 38's in the 357? That could have been your problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No Forester. The gun was clean. The first rounds I fired were the 357s. I only fired a total 24, then some 38s. Never have the problem with Winchester, or Blazer Brass. Even Academy Serbian Monarch's I have do well. Just happened with these. But they were accurate. I do clean the gun every time I go to range with it.
 

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Not meant as a criticism. just one explanation for what may have been happening. Do you have any more of the blazers left? Did you notice any sign of a bulge around the case where the bullet is seated?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hope it didn't come across that way! :) I was looking at my ammo just now. Fiocchis, Winchester, Blazer Brass and Monarch in 357, and Winchester, Monarch and Blazer in 38...all slide right in, and drop right out. The aluminum fits snug enough, not to drop right back out. However...there are two chambers that are very tight. I tried putting in about 50 different rounds of aluminum, and these two chambers are always tighter. Think I should have those two chambers honed to match the other four? Or just not worry about it if I don't shoot the aluminum? For years had no problems. Just this new stuff (for me) that I tried. It seems obvious now that two chambers are snugger than the other four. I know a lot of you guys have good experience and advice. Thanks!
 

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Over the years, I've probably shot >10,000 rounds of the 115gr. 9mm stuff in various firearms of that cartridge chambering - and it's still my favorite brand of the "cheap" factory 9mm stuff. JMO, But I consider 9mm Blazer aluminum case ammo far superior to the beloved WWB and UMC stuff that most other folks like. My only complaint is minor - I wish they would load the stuff with a gunpowder that has less muzzle flash.

In the 9mm cartridge, I've found it to be pretty clean-shooting and always operates flawlessly in my firearms. I've never had any stuck or split aluminum cases. For many years, you could buy it every day at Academy Outdoors for $3.99/box. Occasionally, they would run specials at $2.99/box and that's when I would stock up. I don't buy it anymore because it's gotten expensive enough to justify handloading 9mm Luger again.

I haven't shot as much of it, but my comments on alum. Blazer .45acp and .38 Special would be the same. In fact, my .38 Special carry ammo is some alum. Blazer 158gr. +P SWCHP.

Makes me wonder if CCI/Speer has been cutting corners in recent times with cheap gunpowder?

xtm
 

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Before You have any cylinder honeing done, You might want to scrub out the cylinders with a tight bronze brush and a short section of cleaning rod chucked into your electric drill.

Several times, I've had revolver cylinders build up hard fouling so uniformly throughout that it wasn't noticeable with a visual inspection. Continued shooting probably squishes the carbon and unburned crud into a hard glaze and makes extraction difficult.

You can perform this operation with or without the cylinder on the revolver. On a SS gun, I would not hesitate to wrap a piece of 0000 steel wool into the brush. YoYo the brush back and forth in each cylinder as the rod rotates in the drill and occasionally add a few drops of solvent to the brush. Sometimes, this type of fouling is hard to completely remove with regular back-and-forth scrubbing.

Be sure to wear gloves and eye protection. The cylinder will heat up and the brush will remove hide if it contacts your hand.

xtm
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well..............Forester & xtimberman..........
As Forester first suggested, and xtimberman followed up with?
I've always thought that I was cleaning the chambers really well after shooting. They always looked nice and clean and shiny. Always use the brush, swab and pathches. I even looked at it with a flashlight and and even used a magnifying glass! Looked great. I went ahead and and used the brush wrapped in 00 steel wool with the drill. Damn!!! :eek: I couldn't believe the carbon that I got out. You guys were spot on! kfjdrfirii That's what's great about this forum. Problem. Answer. Problem solved. My apologies for thinking I was doing a good job cleaning. Problem just didn't show up until these aluminum 357's. I know that there have to be others that can benefit from this lesson. Even if you're not having isues with sticking cartridges. Thanks for all the advice. Periodically, this is now part of my cleaning regimine. ihfnlllllq
 
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