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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this an appropriate topic?

I hope so. Last spring and summer, I found a regional smith who works only on black powder arms of all kinds, with the exception of the occasional BP conversion for Cowboy Action Shooters.

I found him for restoration work on a BP single-shot rifle I inherited. He is a gem. There are other points to be considered, so could we have an opinion by the owner/moderators?

Thanks,

Bill
 
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I know I'd be very interested in hearing about your gunsmith. Would love to see pictures of his work. And yes, this is certainly a fine subject for this forum...Hope you've even got some pics.. :)

giz
 

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Bill,
I look forward also to hearing about your experiences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Being new here, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't stepping on a regulation or something. I will also say up-front that I have no financial interest whatsoever in any transactions as a result of this post.

The gunsmith is Jud Elking. He runs the family ranch outside of Hollister, CA, and works almost entirely on pre-1896 firearms. The exception is, if you are a Cowboy Action Shooter or similar hobbyist, he will modify late-model reproductions such as the 1860 Army to fire a modern round such a .45 Long Colt.

Check his website at: http://www.sidesaddleandco.com/judd/braggin.html
Email: [email protected]
Telephone: 831-801-2102

An elderly family friend had left to me a percussion rifle that looked to have potential, but was in pretty sad shape.

Jud's restoration included taking the arm apart and restoring judiciously without destroying any patina, while also fabricating the necessary replacement parts. The stock had been broken at some point and had been repaired by a long-dead gunsmith, who wrapped it tightly with wire. That style, common through the late 1870s, was left alone; Jud's position is that it is part of the arm's provenance, and is honest period repair.

The upshot: I now have a really neat heirloom that dates to the early- or mid-1840s -- at least the lock does; the arm may have been rebarrelled at some point prior to turn of the 20th century.

I'd recommend Jud's antique restoration work to anyone; he is particularly fond of flintlock rifles and fowling pieces, and has done restoration work on such early arms for people and museums here and abroad. Jud also is a man you can do business with on a handshake. We did, and we both appreciated it, given that these days, such folks seem to be fewer and further between.

And when I can get the money ahead (tougher and tougher to do, given the current state of politics and the economy), I am going to go the 1860 Army repro modification to shoot period cartridges.

About pictures: I wish I could post some, and at some point probably I'll be able to. Right now, that's beyond my skill level with computers. (Guess I'll have to beat on one of my kids to do it for me or show me how it's done.)

Thanks, and good acquiring, collecting and shooting!

Bill
 
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