Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,707 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not insane .. I know blued finishes rub and there is nothing you can do to make that not happen other than shutting it up in a safe. Having said that .. I would like to maintain my new 28 as best I can and while I have owned other blued guns they were kind of beaters and I didnt care much.

So I will probably make my own holster with a smooth interior but .. what should I do as a general rule for upkeep. Just oil it with gun oil and wipe it off? Ren wax .. even on the barrel which may get hot? How about storage .. Should I keep it in the cardboard box a gun rug, wrapped in an oiled rag ... just not sweat it?

Figured I would ask. I know its going to get rubbed and .. god forbid .... dinged if I carry and shot it but the finish is in about as close to mint condition as you can find and if I can do anything to keep it looking primo I would like to. Any and all advice is welcome!!
Alex
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,664 Posts
The high edges will wear from holster carry. They probably take the most friction whether you draw the gun or just let it jostle inside the holster. A lined holster makes a lot of sense.

I think it's the concentration of forces on the edge that causes the wear because the bluing (a stable form of Iron Oxide Fe3O4 called "Magnetite") is much harder than steel. Both salt and rust bluing processes are passivation conversion processes turning the iron in the surface steel into a very thin layer of Magnetite. The chemistry, technique and polishing applied by a manufacturer can leave a variety of thicknesses of bluing. Also, one way to judge an old gun's age is to look into the bluing with a surface microscope. There will generally be red iron oxide (Fe2O3) dispersed on the surface which forms over time even on blued steel.

I collect older guns that have been both rust blued and salt blued. In both cases, preservation involves periodic cleaning that finishes with a preserving gun oil. I don't wax the surface, and you have to be careful about getting some forms of polymers like silicone on the surface because it's very difficult to remove. Any gun that has active iron oxide spots needs to have those removed because they will lead to pitting. I'm not talking about the oxide dispersed broadly within the finish, but spots of rust. I use well oiled "0000" steel wool gently on a well oiled surface. Since the magnetite is harder than steel, if you do this gently you'll not damage the finish.

I keep my guns inside a gun run, but many people recommend keeping them inside your safe in a rack without any case, allowing free air circulation. As long as you keep the humidity low that will work. The box could attract humidity in some cases which is why most guns ship inside oil paper or something with a metal preservative.

Use great care when you carry it and shoot it. Remember that over cleaning can cause as much wear as just using it.

Here's a 1938 Mauser Luger in close to factory state with a small amount of edge wear in it's original finish (now 82 years old). This firearm was in a salt blued military grade finish, and had been issued and used before it was captured:

1938Mauser_Luger2.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,483 Posts
Clean after use.
Light coating of gun oil and store in a soft gun rug.
Refresh the oil not less then annually.
Agree with the above, don't go nuts with cleaning.
kfjdrfirii
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,005 Posts
Most anything you use will work. If you take a few minutes to research Ballistol you will find it has been serving as an excellent firearm preserver for over 100 years and best of all it is good for your skin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,707 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I assume cleaning the frame around the forcing cone with a brass brush is out?

My bag is loaded up and i will give her a run tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,707 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think I will refrain from the pocket knife but .. Sure would like to hear if a brass brush is OK?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,664 Posts
Hard things abrade softer things. Rather than a brush, try a small tuft of oiled bronze wool on the tip of a Q-Tip.

Bronze (made of copper, lead, tin and zinc in various alloys) should be softer than the hardened steel used in firearm frames. Note that the still is not that hard, and can be damaged if you use too much focused pressure.

So, properly used, a bronze brush should not damage a steel gun or it's magnetite bluing. Keep the surfaces (gun and brush) oiled. Don't reverse the brush whiskers while they are in contact with the gun's steel surface. Just pull it across all the way.

BTW, I would not use a stainless steel brush on a steel firearm or inside the barrel.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mac23 and Boriqua

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,664 Posts
I added a note. There are various alloys of bronze, some harder than others (making the bristles of the brush stiffer).

Consider getting some bronze wool from the hardware store. That's what I use (a small tuft on the end of a Q-Tip).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Boriqua

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,483 Posts
I assume cleaning the frame around the forcing cone with a brass brush is out?

My bag is loaded up and i will give her a run tomorrow.
Nylon is softer. I use nylon brushes.
Don't use a pocket knife. :shock:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top