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I have guns that get a checkup twice each year but receive little attention between exams. All I've ever used is Remoil or any gun oil to wipe off the metal and wipe the bore. I've never had a rust problem thats visible. The gun's are stored in climate controlled space. Handguns are kept in zip-up cases.

I've read somewhere that a good car paste wax is ideal for protecting gun barrels and receivers. Anybody here use car wax, or is gun oil just as good (or better)?

Is a certain type or brand of oil preferred for storage? Any other tips for gun storage?
 

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Remoil is all I use. All my firearms are in my Gun safe with a Goldenrod dehumidifier installed. Never have had any issues.
I have heard of using paste wax but never tried it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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High humidity in the mid 20s with the normal humidity in the low teens; Reason #2,470 for living in Arizona :D
 
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PhotoDude;118319 Geezer- Do you buy the wipes or the oil or both? Do you buy directly from Rusterprufe or a local source? Their shipping charge for a starter kit is kind of salty.[/QUOTE said:
I have several of the wipes and now I just get the refill bottles.

Personally, I don't think you need to buy their specific wipes, you can no doubt use your own substitute. However, you should have a small jar with a tight lid to store your used/soaked wipe and a bit of the fluid in. That way you don't waste the residual that your wipe is already soaked with.........you just put it back in the jar and reuse it again. BTW, I clean the gun with Hoppes prior to using Rusteprufe (although you can also use Rusteprufe as a cleaning solvent), so my wipes don't get very contaminated with black stuff. The wipes and the solvent/protective oil lasts me a long time.

I recently bought a bottle of oil/refill from the website.

Best Regards,

Geezer
 

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Here's my "Big 3" for lube and storage:



I use the RemOil for my regularly-used guns, or for penetrating into lockworks/trigger assemblies I don't want to disassemble at the time. It's a great penetrator and rust-preventative, much better than WD-40, but it DOES "pool" at the lowest point a firearm is stored at, over time, due it's low viscosity.

The military LSA (Lubricant, Small Arms) I have used since 1978, when I used it cleaning/storing my M16 and 1911 in the Army; it's a semi-fluid lube, and stays PUT if you use a light coat on the bores, lockworks, etc. It works without "gumming-up" in sub-zero temps, as well as protects during high-temp firing volleys. Some of my handguns hang "upside-down" by their trigger guards in long-term storage, and the LSA won't "drain-down" to the lowest point when they're stored for long periods of time. Military-surplus LSA is getting harder to find these days, I believe they now use CLP ("Breakfree"), which is pretty close to what old LSA is; usually, one of our military-surplus stores here carries it, and a case of 12 bottles lasted me from 1987 to last summer, when I bought another 12 bottles, so I should be good to go for the foreseeable future on it.

The "Gunslick" is a semi-solid, graphite-based grease that I use on all my semi-auto's, and it is the best thing I've found to keep tight slides in stainless-steel semi-auto's from galling after they get hot from usage. Like the LSA, it'll "stay put" in long-term storage, too.

DocZeus
AKA
David
 

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AZMick has it right for most of us Arizona guys, moisture generally isn't a problem, but I took to the habit a couple of years back using wax instead of an oil coating. I couldn't easily get the much suggested Renaissance Wax (not cheap either), but I opted for the more common Min-Wax which is available at nearly every hardware store. I clean off all the oils on the outside after cleaning with denatured alcohol and then coat the gun with wax; let set and then wipe off as you would a car finish or piece of wood. They shine, but again the protection from moisture remains a non-issue due to our low humidity. One upside to wax vs. oil is they're not messy to handle or show to others, plus prints wipe right off.
 

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AZMick has it right for most of us Arizona guys, moisture generally isn't a problem, but I took to the habit a couple of years back using wax instead of an oil coating. I couldn't easily get the much suggested Renaissance Wax (not cheap either), but I opted for the more common Min-Wax which is available at nearly every hardware store. I clean off all the oils on the outside after cleaning with denatured alcohol and then coat the gun with wax; let set and then wipe off as you would a car finish or piece of wood. They shine, but again the protection from moisture remains a non-issue due to our low humidity. One upside to wax vs. oil is they're not messy to handle or show to others, plus prints wipe right off.
Thanks for the report about wax BC............I've never used it, but now I'm curious.

Best Regards,

Geeze
 

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Discussion Starter #10
AZMick has it right for most of us Arizona guys, moisture generally isn't a problem, but I took to the habit a couple of years back using wax instead of an oil coating. I couldn't easily get the much suggested Renaissance Wax (not cheap either), but I opted for the more common Min-Wax which is available at nearly every hardware store. I clean off all the oils on the outside after cleaning with denatured alcohol and then coat the gun with wax; let set and then wipe off as you would a car finish or piece of wood. They shine, but again the protection from moisture remains a non-issue due to our low humidity. One upside to wax vs. oil is they're not messy to handle or show to others, plus prints wipe right off.
I've ordered the Renissance wax to give it a try. It is quite expensive, but my wife will have uses for it, too. Thanks.

Will try the other suggested products, too. Nothing too good for my guns.
 

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I've ordered the Renissance wax to give it a try. It is quite expensive, but my wife will have uses for it, too. Thanks.

Will try the other suggested products, too. Nothing too good for my guns.
Dude ,

It is pricy , but a little does go a long way . And as u mentioned there are many uses for it.

I like Eezox as a rust preventative ( it is highly recommended on the Seecamp forum ) , however there are a bunch of products that will work .

I also use BoreStores on my keepsakes .


Regards ,
George
 

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Renaissance Wax is a preservative only when used in a controlled humidity type of environment. The current preservative du jour is Eezox. Birchwood Casey Barricade (formerly Sheath) is also fairly good. Any wax you use must be 100% free of abrasives and this therefore excludes most but not all automotive products.

Bruce
 

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When I moved into my house in 1997, I cleaned and coated most of my rifles with Super Lube and put them up in a closet . I have been taking them out this year and cleaning off the dust and replacing the coating. They look like they did when they were put up. They are both blued and parkerized with some bolts and other parts in the white.
 
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