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I have a family heirloom 1935 that I love to carry as my back up. Unfortunately, it seems to be very prone to feed jams during initial rack load and subsequent auto follow-up rounds.

I have the original magazine and a recently purchased new one. Same problem, both magazines. I've tried Browning and CCI LRN and Mag-Safe JHP.

My gunsmith has gone through both the handgun and both magazines, with nothing jumping out at him. He thinks that it might be just a finicky gun that will only work with certain brands and types of ammo.

He also said that at the Colorado School of Trades for Gunsmithing had a bad experience at one time with Fiochi, and even though it might of been only one bad batch, they won't let Fiochi ammo back in the school. So it seems that ammo sometimes is an issue.

I'm hoping that someone has had the same problem and can shed some light on this.

Timbo
 

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Try changing the Recoil Spring.... even if it's not kinked.... if the origional is still in the gun it could be over 70 years old.... they don't last forever.

I think that Wolff Spring still has a kit for these guns....
 

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I'm a couple of years late responding to this thread, but thought I'd join in...I also have an inherited 1935. It's the first handgun other than a capgun that I learned to shoot, at about age 8 a bit more than 50 years ago. As for ammo, many of the 1935's require "hot" military grade .32 caliber for proper blowback/ejection. Without that the ammo has a tendency to jam up. I've used Winchester and Remington and other US made ammo, but all jam either all the time or often. The best ammo I've found for the Beretta 1935 .32, never having had a jam with it, is by Sellier & Bellot, and by prvi partizan (a Serbian make). I've used another brand made in Czechoslovakia but can't remember the name. Look for ammo with the red circle or red coated center at the rear of the casing/cap. It never fails. Remember - military grade ammo for military grade firearms.

And I agree - the 1935 is underrated in every way. It's a great handgun for how it's meant to be used, and for having a ball at the range.
 

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Any difference with different ammo?

Berettashooter

I'm a couple of years late responding to this thread, but thought I'd join in...I also have an inherited 1935. It's the first handgun other than a capgun that I learned to shoot, at about age 8 a bit more than 50 years ago. As for ammo, many of the 1935's require "hot" military grade .32 caliber for proper blowback/ejection. Without that the ammo has a tendency to jam up. I've used Winchester and Remington and other US made ammo, but all jam either all the time or often. The best ammo I've found for the Beretta 1935 .32, never having had a jam with it, is by Sellier & Bellot, and by prvi partizan (a Serbian make). I've used another brand made in Czechoslovakia but can't remember the name. Look for ammo with the red circle or red coated center at the rear of the casing/cap. It never fails. Remember - military grade ammo for military grade firearms.

And I agree - the 1935 is underrated in every way. It's a great handgun for how it's meant to be used, and for having a ball at the range.



I have a family heirloom 1935 that I love to carry as my back up. Unfortunately, it seems to be very prone to feed jams during initial rack load and subsequent auto follow-up rounds.

I have the original magazine and a recently purchased new one. Same problem, both magazines. I've tried Browning and CCI LRN and Mag-Safe JHP.

My gunsmith has gone through both the handgun and both magazines, with nothing jumping out at him. He thinks that it might be just a finicky gun that will only work with certain brands and types of ammo.

He also said that at the Colorado School of Trades for Gunsmithing had a bad experience at one time with Fiochi, and even though it might of been only one bad batch, they won't let Fiochi ammo back in the school. So it seems that ammo sometimes is an issue.

I'm hoping that someone has had the same problem and can shed some light on this.

Timbo
 

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recoil spring

Try changing the Recoil Spring.... even if it's not kinked.... if the origional is still in the gun it could be over 70 years old.... they don't last forever.

I think that Wolff Spring still has a kit for these guns....

do you or anyone else know where i can get a recoil spring for model 1935 ?
 

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