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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently acquired an older looking revolver, which I was told was a .38 s&w. After further looking I see it could be a .44, based on the stamp on the top ridge of barrel. But they also made different chamberings which did include a .38. I'm hoping to figure out what it is for sure, since I don't know a ton about older guns.
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I recently acquired an older looking revolver, which I was told was a .38 s&w. After further looking I see it could be a .44, based on the stamp on the top ridge of barrel. But they also made different chamberings which did include a .38. I'm hoping to figure out what it is for sure, since I don't know a ton about older guns. View attachment 473263 View attachment 473264
Is the barrel plugged? Looks like a pin drilled across through the barrel near the muzzle.

Looks similar to my double action 4th change .32 S&W caliber. But yours looks larger - mine is a definite vest-pocket hideaway gun.

Per the Standard Catalog it looks like a .38 Double Action Second Model. It has the curved side plate, so is not the First model. It has the re-curve trigger guard, pinned front sight. It also has dual cylinder stop grooves so isn't the Third or later models. Manufacture dates 1880-1884, serials ran 4001-119000, which agrees with your number. I believe it would shoot standard load .38S&W rounds (NOT .38 Special!) as long as the barrel isn't fouled by a pin!
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, being I haven't had much experience with guns, much less older models. I wasn't sure if I was looking through the right places.
And yes, it had the barrel drilled and pinned near the front sight. Right through a couple barrel grooves, so I'm guess they wanted it to be a decorative piece or decommissioned. I don't personally know why one would drill those aside from not wanting it to be shot.

I had been hoping to find a new barrel, so I could fire it atleast once. But its sad to me thinking of placing a new barrel on a older piece that otherwise is original. Numbers matching on bottom of grip, cylinder, and the break action release.

I do like it as a decorative piece, as I collect old stuff. But having it in working order would be a site as well. After having looked the barrel over other than the pin holes, it does seem to have a small portion chipped, or blown of from around the rear end of barrel, which would like up with the firing hole for a round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had this oldy looking one. A buddy had said it was a single shot, black powder loaded ranch gun. Something about a cap was placed infront of the hammer, before loading powder and a bullet. Still have no idea what year it could be.
 

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And yes, it had the barrel drilled and pinned near the front sight. Right through a couple barrel grooves, so I'm guess they wanted it to be a decorative piece or decommissioned. I don't personally know why one would drill those aside from not wanting it to be shot.
So if someone fired it without noticing the pin, he'd get a big surprise; very intelligent, when the firing pin could have been broken off more easily than drilling it. Maybe it could have been intended for use as a starter pistol with blanks, but that's still an extreme way to make a starter pistol .
 

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Welcome to the forum! Nice older classic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, and glad to have joined. I've found I have a fondness for older, and more classic stuff recently. I just love the fact they withstand the sands of time, and can still be in such great condition. Compared to today's stuff, which just doesn't have the same craftsmanship or overall pride in the making of.
 
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