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Discussion Starter #1
Cross posted on another forum, this is my story.

Fun topic I wanted to write about, and how I got sucked into BPCR.

This is about a man I used to discuss the Korean War at length with while we were blessed with his present on this earth. Let’s call him Mike for this discussion.

Mike was a Infantryman in the Army during the Korean War. A vet shot in the back during the retrea...errrrr, strategic fall back of the Chosen Reservoir around December of 1950 in North Korea. He received what the medics called a “Lucky” shot, through the back, between two ribs, and exit out the chest. The result was two holes and a punctured lung. No bone fragmentation that could have proven fatal. His son said this:
"Dad was shot through his lung cavity missing his lung as the shot went through him during an exhale otherwise he probably would have drown in the blood from his lungs bleeding.In his back and out his shoulder...armour piercing round.The only handicap was a shortened tendon and he couldn't hold his arm above his head tight up to his ear...almost but no quite......Disability check was like $75. that was the same as their house payment at the time. North Koren helped to pay for my parents house dad used to joke ...LoL"

The war was over for Mike. He returned to Tacoma WA to become a very successful Wood Shop teacher for the Tacoma school district for over 30 years.

Upon return to Tacoma once he healed, Mike and his brother purchased two Springfield Trapdoors from a Mil Surp store in Tacoma near the Ft. Lewis base. Mike maintained possession of his trapdoor until his death in the 21[SUP]st[/SUP] century however his brother’s was stolen from his home.
My good friend had his father’s rifle properly stored in a safe for years. He said his dad was a reloader and caster back in the day. They shot muzzleloaders , BPCR and pistols as sport.

I was privileged to pay for and accept Mike’s rifle from my good friend recently when he moved to Oz in 2013. The rifle was in beautiful condition and Keith (Trapdoor Keith when he was alive) gave me extensive history on the firearm saying it came from the Oregon National Guard(1894) and declared surplus sometime after that. How accurate Keith's information, I do not know. But it was part of the story I did not know.

I decided to pull apart one of the bullets his father made that came with this aquisition. Best I can tell, sometime between 1951 and 1965 these bullets were made when he was actively reloading/casting and shooting. He had at least 80 rounds like this.

The first thing I noticed was a fine thin film of lacquer (assumed) peeling off these primer. The winchester brass , well, I'm unsure of the date but it is in great shape. I do not know the year but I would guess it's from between 1925 and 1960.


The 500 grain bullet I pulled apart. (which weighed 525 gr)


I know that Mike used this powder back in his day as it came with the rifle and bullets. Matter of fact, I tested this powder and it was fit for shooting.


Photo of the powder after pulling the bullet. Not much crushing, in very good shape.



Photo of the bullet, and lube, still in tact, if not darked by the ages.


The bullet weighed in at 523 gr.


A modern day bullet by Dan the Bullet Man in 500 gr, weighs in at 528 gr. For the record, my 500 gr Lyman mold (457125) casts at 510 grs with 20-1.


3 bullets. Top is topic bullet. Middle is Bull Shop bullet. Bottom is my cast bullet (waiting on SPG lube in the mail!)


And his two bullet types, as they were.


These are my test bullets (Both Lyman molds) I am testing with others in various crimp/BP/Smokeless configurations.





Mike himself, doing what he loved to do! Teach woodworking!



Mike's rifle (Which I am in possession of)






I think somewhere up there, he's looking down and smiling at me. I feel that spirit!

His son said:
"The only handicap was a shortened tendon and he couldn't hold his arm above his head tight up to his ear...almost but no quite......Disability check was like $75. that was the same as their house payment at the time. North Koren helped to pay for my parents house dad used to joke ...LoL"
[/quote]
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Injunbro....I dream of owning a era correct Carbine! Nice pair of rifles you have there.!

I am competing in my first BPCR soon at 300-500 yards in June.

I have been practicing on our gun club 200 yd range and manage to keep 60% of the bullets inside the 13" black.

 

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Great post Sportsdad. I had an 1884 Cadet rifle years ago and had a lot of fun with it. Lately have been thinking about getting another one.

John
 

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Thanks for the outstanding story of a great man and how you are carrying on the legacy of his rifle. Good luck in competition.

Sent from my LG-D950 using Tapatalk
 

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What did you size your bullets at? I was having trouble with bullet tumbling out of my 1888 till an old caster told me to try .461. Rifle instantly started printing 3-4in groups at 100yds.
 

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Great story to go with a great rifle. Good luck on your first shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What did you size your bullets at? I was having trouble with bullet tumbling out of my 1888 till an old caster told me to try .461. Rifle instantly started printing 3-4in groups at 100yds.
I slugged the barrel and it slugged at .458 believe it or not. This rifle was used very little. So I size them .459.

Sorry for the delayed response.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I personally love the .45-70.
A Ruger #1, 2 Sharps copies and a High Wall copy are in my stable.
With a spitzer boat tail bullet you'll be amazed.
That's a nice collection.

We're heading to the C Sharps and Shiloh factories this month after dropping the kid off at college in Grand Junction. Taking the slow way home.
I am going to convince SWMBO that I need to put a deposit down for the following rifle. It will be a retirement gift since I retire in June of 2018.

1874 MONTANA ROUGHRIDER
1 x $2,628.00
CALIBER: 45-70
BARREL LENGTH: 30"
BARREL WEIGHT: HVY.OCT
BARREL FEATURES: NONE
WOOD UPGRADES: STANDARD
WOOD FINISHES: NONE
LENGTH OF PULL - SHOTGUN BUTTSTOCKS ONLY!: NONE
METAL FINISHES: STANDARD COLOR CASED
BUTTPLATE: TRADITIONAL STEEL (+$96.00)
BACKGROUND FILL - (ENGRAVED FRENCH GRAY ONLY): NONE
BRASS ESCUTCHEONS: NONE
CUSTOM BEDDING: NONE
SLING SWIVELS: NONE
TRADITIONAL CHECKERING: NONE
FOREARM TIPS: NONE
HARTFORD COLLAR: NONE
POLISHED SCREWS: FIREBLUED (+$77.00)
SCHNABBLE ON PISTOL GRIP: NONE
REAR BARREL SIGHT: NO REAR DOVETAIL
VERNIER TANG SIGHTS: #108 MID-RANGE (+$316.00)
FRONT SIGHT: SHILOH #111 (+$80.00)
DRILL AND TAP MVA SCOPE: NONE
 

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Hey 60,

Wow! Never going to get the "dinger ringing grin" off your face!

Good for you!!

Later, Mark
 

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Hey Iggy,

Fine pair of 45/70's.

Have you ever made the Quigley?

Later, Mark
 

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Mark,

No, all I ever did was a friend had range set up culminating in a steel buffalo at a thousand yards up in the mountains west of here. Had some fun there.

A bunch of fellers was shootin' at the buffalo and Itchy comes up and wants to try it. I showed her how to use the sights and all .. Standing, she shoots, waits, lowers the rifle, and says, "did I miss?" Bong!!! :eek:
I wouldn't let her play anymore.:( I told her it's always good to quit on a hit.;):D

Shot a few antelope, deer, elk and lots of pests with 45-70s. It's a heck of a round.
 

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Hey Iggy,

That is great!

1,000 yds off hand.......with YOUR rifle!

Good for Miss Ithcy!

Later, Mark
 
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