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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
thanks in advance for any help!! I’m Looking to get est year and value. I don’t shoot this as it was given to me by my great uncle who was a policeman. My wife says her dad said these had a tendency to split or crack when shot

I’m really confused on some posts. Pic attached. Serial on butt bottom 1055xx. On inside pic attached. Upside down L and 321173 There is no other markings on the gun inside or out

Gordon

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Thanks for the reply I appreciate it. What do you mean by flat latch?
Flat latch refers to the cylinder release , because it is fairly flat. They only made them that way for a while in the 50's and I think very early 60's. Your revolver was made before S&W started using a model number system, which took place in 1958. From 58 on, ones like yours were known as the model 36
 

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Actually if it is marked AIRWEIGHT (I can't read the barrel markings in your pics) then it is what came to be known as the model 37 (not 36). The model 36 was the all steel version.

These old aluminum alloy revolvers can crack just above the yoke cutout where the barrel screws into the frame.

Swing open the cylinder as if you were going to load it and turn the gun upside down (grip pointing straight up) and look at the flat area above the yoke where the barrel screws into the frame. Inspect it carefully under a bright light.

A lot of people say these are OK to shoot with mild to standard pressure, 148gr-158gr lead bullet loads.

You should avoid shooting plus P (+P) loads and jacketed bullets, or light weight bullets like 110gr or 125gr.

Just be aware that the aluminum frame CAN crack. It isn't a common occurrence, but it has been known to happen.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

Looks like a fine little snub nose!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually if it is marked AIRWEIGHT (I can't read the barrel markings in your pics) then it is what came to be known as the model 37 (not 36). The model 36 was the all steel version.

These old aluminum alloy revolvers can crack just above the yoke cutout where the barrel screws into the frame.

Swing open the cylinder as if you were going to load it and turn the gun upside down (grip pointing straight up) and look at the flat area above the yoke where the barrel screws into the frame. Inspect it carefully under a bright light.

A lot of people say these are OK to shoot with mild to standard pressure, 148gr-158gr lead bullet loads.

You should avoid shooting plus P (+P) loads and jacketed bullets, or light weight bullets like 110gr or 125gr.

Just be aware that the aluminum frame CAN crack. It isn't a common occurrence, but it has been known to happen.
What’s everyone’s opinion on shooting these through this gun?
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What’s everyone’s opinion on shooting these through this gun?
View attachment 491560
Honestly, I'd buy some modern 38 wadcutters and shoot those and save what you have in that box (including the box) as a keepsake! You're rarely going to see them again and would sell as is to an old ammo collector!
 

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Hey G,

Welcome to S&W!

Way to go! Pics of a fine "Flat Latch" right out the gate!!

Later, Mark
 
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