Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
If you have used this product you know. Pretty handy.

I switched to much lighter oils, after moving to the Pacific Northwest. FP-10, Hoppes oils, and some others are worthy. But 5 degrees F, I have had issues with perfectly reliable autoloaders, especially both Browning Buckmarks. Rem oil works good at low temps.

In the low desert, I liked the high viscosity oils.

Mind you, Hoppes number nine is addictive, But Ballistol does a good job cleaning and lubricating. It will not stain your clothes.

But it does more than gun stuff.

Get it on your hands, they smooth up. It has been used as an antiseptic. It likes gun leather, as well as human leather. Rubber, makes it look new. Wood? It brings a nice protective polish to fine finished woods, especially deep figured woods like Rosewood laminates, Kingswood, Walnut, Cocobolo and others.

Soak a dirty barrel, set it aside. Use Ballistol on the rest. By the time you are done, the barrel can be cleaned and protected.

Out of dielectric grease? Ballistol can displace water in a switch on your motorcycle, in this case. The one that actuates your electric parking brake. It saved a lot of effort here.

And if it gets on your rubber grips on the bike, well it likes rubber too.

I used a micro fiber cloth that cleaned some guns with some Ballistol on it. On my glasses, which would have been oil streaked if gun oil had been on it. The plastic lenses cleaned beautifully. And fine scratches went away for days.

It is non toxic, and a century old product. Check it out online....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
I use it on my blackpowder rifles for it's ability to clean BP residue. It's a water soluble oil. For BP, I use it in solution with water (and a couple of other commercially available products) to make "Moose Milk" for cleaning between shots when at the range. I love the stuff for BP...for Non-BP there are better products.
Ballistol was developed by/for the Germans who wanted ONE product to use for their firearms, wood and leather gear. Like most things that are called upon to do many diverse things well, there are other specialty product that do each of those things better. While I highly recommend it for BP cleaning I do NOT recommend it for longterm storage of your BP guns.
I shoot my flintlocks weekly, year around and don't use anything beyond ballistol because they're not "stored". I have several other BP rifles that only come out occasionally through the year. Those get cleaned with Ballistol when I'm using them but before putting them away I'm using G96 or Barricade for longterm protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,322 Posts
I have never used Ballistol. I can remember one time when I was was a teen, late 70's, hunting with my dad. I had the old Marlin 336 in 30-30. It was brutally cold that year during deer season and after spending the morning walking the woods we returned to the truck to warm up. As is the law & my dads number one rule when entering the truck, the rifles had to be unloaded. As I racked the lever and kicked out the first shell, the lever froze up. I couldnt close the bolt and neither could my dad so we got the truck warm with the heat blasting and set the rifle in the truck. It took about 5 minutes before we could work the lever, then everything appeared to be normal. At first we thought maybe the gun oil froze up but later decided that some moisture got in the action on the way to the woods and then it froze up while I was out walking in the cold. My dad had hunted with that rifle for over 20 years including a few years in northern Maine and never had anything like that happen, and it hasnt happend since then. Dad never used anything but Hoppes #9 and Hoppes gun oil. Would a different product have made a difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,341 Posts
Here's a link to CMP forum and the subject of Ballistol and corrosive primers. This is what got me "hooked" on Ballistol. I have several 1903A3's and one 1903 which get subjected to corrosive primers and the mixture (1 part Ballistol to 9 parts water) mentioned works a charm. Also mentioned is it's usefulness with BP.

 
  • Like
Reactions: spud_.308 and 1av8r

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
I was at a gun show with a friend and he was selling Ballistol on his table. A very well dressed gent in his late 40s was passing and stopped and looked at the cans on the table. he spoke with a slight German accent and mentioned that he hadn't seen Ballistol for sale since he left Germany. He said when he was a child at home it was one drop in a glass of water for an upset stomach and two drops in a glass of water for constipation. He was totally serious. In Germany it's sold in pharmacies for treating cuts and abrasions. Type Ballistol into the search box on ebay Germany and you will be very surprised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
Not wild about the smell of Ballistol but it has taken WD-40's place at my house. Still addicted to Hoppe's #9 though. First love kind of thing I guess. It's what we were told to use to clean our S&W revolvers in the police academy at Sea Girt, NJ in 1979.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
If you have used this product you know. Pretty handy.

I switched to much lighter oils, after moving to the Pacific Northwest. FP-10, Hoppes oils, and some others are worthy. But 5 degrees F, I have had issues with perfectly reliable autoloaders, especially both Browning Buckmarks. Rem oil works good at low temps.

In the low desert, I liked the high viscosity oils.

Mind you, Hoppes number nine is addictive, But Ballistol does a good job cleaning and lubricating. It will not stain your clothes.

But it does more than gun stuff.

Get it on your hands, they smooth up. It has been used as an antiseptic. It likes gun leather, as well as human leather. Rubber, makes it look new. Wood? It brings a nice protective polish to fine finished woods, especially deep figured woods like Rosewood laminates, Kingswood, Walnut, Cocobolo and others.

Soak a dirty barrel, set it aside. Use Ballistol on the rest. By the time you are done, the barrel can be cleaned and protected.

Out of dielectric grease? Ballistol can displace water in a switch on your motorcycle, in this case. The one that actuates your electric parking brake. It saved a lot of effort here.

And if it gets on your rubber grips on the bike, well it likes rubber too.

I used a micro fiber cloth that that cleaned some guns with some Ballistol on it. On my glasses, which would have been oil streaked if gun oil had been on it. The plastic lenses cleaned beautifully. And fine scratches went away for days.

It is non toxic, and a century old product. Check it out online....
If you have used this product you know. Pretty handy.

I switched to much lighter oils, after moving to the Pacific Northwest. FP-10, Hoppes oils, and some others are worthy. But 5 degrees F, I have had issues with perfectly reliable autoloaders, especially both Browning Buckmarks. Rem oil works good at low temps.

In the low desert, I liked the high viscosity oils.

Mind you, Hoppes number nine is addictive, But Ballistol does a good job cleaning and lubricating. It will not stain your clothes.

But it does more than gun stuff.

Get it on your hands, they smooth up. It has been used as an antiseptic. It likes gun leather, as well as human leather. Rubber, makes it look new. Wood? It brings a nice protective polish to fine finished woods, especially deep figured woods like Rosewood laminates, Kingswood, Walnut, Cocobolo and others.

Soak a dirty barrel, set it aside. Use Ballistol on the rest. By the time you are done, the barrel can be cleaned and protected.

Out of dielectric grease? Ballistol can displace water in a switch on your motorcycle, in this case. The one that actuates your electric parking brake. It saved a lot of effort here.

And if it gets on your rubber grips on the bike, well it likes rubber too.

I used a micro fiber cloth that that cleaned some guns with some Ballistol on it. On my glasses, which would have been oil streaked if gun oil had been on it. The plastic lenses cleaned beautifully. And fine scratches went away for days.

It is non toxic, and a century old product. Check it out online....
If you have used this product you know. Pretty handy.

I switched to much lighter oils, after moving to the Pacific Northwest. FP-10, Hoppes oils, and some others are worthy. But 5 degrees F, I have had issues with perfectly reliable autoloaders, especially both Browning Buckmarks. Rem oil works good at low temps.

In the low desert, I liked the high viscosity oils.

Mind you, Hoppes number nine is addictive, But Ballistol does a good job cleaning and lubricating. It will not stain your clothes.

But it does more than gun stuff.

Get it on your hands, they smooth up. It has been used as an antiseptic. It likes gun leather, as well as human leather. Rubber, makes it look new. Wood? It brings a nice protective polish to fine finished woods, especially deep figured woods like Rosewood laminates, Kingswood, Walnut, Cocobolo and others.

Soak a dirty barrel, set it aside. Use Ballistol on the rest. By the time you are done, the barrel can be cleaned and protected.

Out of dielectric grease? Ballistol can displace water in a switch on your motorcycle, in this case. The one that actuates your electric parking brake. It saved a lot of effort here.

And if it gets on your rubber grips on the bike, well it likes rubber too.

I used a micro fiber cloth that that cleaned some guns with some Ballistol on it. On my glasses, which would have been oil streaked if gun oil had been on it. The plastic lenses cleaned beautifully. And fine scratches went away for days.

It is non toxic, and a century old product. Check it out online....
I use Ballistol almost exclusively because it’s versatile and it works. Just wish it smelled like Hoppers #9.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,055 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: BlackBat242
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top