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Discussion Starter #1
My brother recently picked up a S&W M22-4. I got a chance to handle it the other day. I like it, a lot. If I
were still carrying badge, I would probably have one on my belt. (When I was an LEO, I rebuilt a M28-2 into a 45 ACP.) The 22-4 seems to be everything I needed in revolver. I did not get a chance to fire it but I imagine it will do fine. To me, it is a modern version of the old Heavy Duty revolver. The only thing I would change is the grips, it came with Pachmyers and I would have wood or stag.
 

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A model 22 is an N-frame .45 ACP revolver. It's a continuation of the model 1917 that was introduced in ww1.
 
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Here is a photo I grabbed off the internet. edit. Forget the grabbed shot, it went blurry. Here is a shot of one of my 22-4s.



Kevin
 

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Re: OP. Agree. Have a 21-4 Thunder Ranch in .44 Special. Extremely accurate revolver. Fit and finish are remarkable. At 10yds. it six rounds of Remington LRN ammo are all touching. POI is POA at 15 yds. Using CCI Blazer 200 gr. JHP's, POI is maybe one inch below POA at 15 yds. Very pleased with it. Do not like round-butt grip. ASAP will find and buy round to square butt conversion grips or else rework some S&W target grips to fit the 21-4. Later will likely also add a gold bead front sight. Excellent revolver in every respect. JMHO. Sincerely. bruce.
 

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Great revolvers. I have both the 21-4 & the 22-4. I put smooth(no bark) stags on the 22-4 and that was all it needed. I put rd to sq butt S&W grips on the 21-4 and installed a Patridge front sight as the original one was too sort causing the gun to shoot low.
 

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.38-44 006.JPG Other than the fact that the Heavy Duty is a .38 Special that dates to an era when .38 High Velocity, .38-44 and similar were available in factory loadings with up to 200 grain bullets, I am with you. I did own for a time a IL Model 22-4. On a duty belt I can see it. For EDC concealed it was problematic.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
...Other than the fact that the Heavy Duty is a .38 Special...
My knowledge of HDs is skimpy at best, (I like them I just don't know a lot about them, except I wish I would have bought them when they were cheap). Were they not offered chambered for other cartridges?


...I did own for a time a IL Model 22-4. On a duty belt I can see it. For EDC concealed it was problematic.
I have been carrying that 28 for a long time. It is heavy but with a proper holster and belt, it is what I prefer. But like so many other things, not for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
From what I understand the HD was a fixed sight N frame chambered for the 38 Special. The Outdoorsman was the same with adjustable sights?

What was the 44 Special with fixed sights?
 

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Before WWII there were 3 models of .44 Special. The first model -- called the triple lock -- was discontinued in 1915. The second model which eliminated the third lock and underlug was introduced in 1915. And, the third model -- also called the Model 1926 -- which reintroduced the underlug without the third lock upon the request of Wolff & Klar. The 2nd and 3rd models were sold concurrently, but the 3rd model wasn't cataloged until the late 1930's because it was special order only until then.
 

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1938S7WCat44Mil.jpg In 1938 they were called the .44 and .45 Military. This probably originates with the great number of Springfield Armory inspected Model 1917 surplus frames that were available and used in the years between the wars.


Click on the bar to focus the text

Something maybe worth looking at (?) might be the Taurus 431. Although it is a 5 shooter it has mass and is a fixed sight proposition.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you all, I like large bore revolvers, preferably some flavor of 45. The S&W N frame is what I am used to carrying so I will stick with my home built one. Just wish I could have had one of these 22-4s when I was wearing a badge. I like the looks of the fixed sighted revolver better than the adjustable ones and for duty, (i.e. one load), adjustables are really not necessary.
 

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Thank you all, I like large bore revolvers, preferably some flavor of 45. The S&W N frame is what I am used to carrying so I will stick with my home built one. Just wish I could have had one of these 22-4s when I was wearing a badge. I like the looks of the fixed sighted revolver better than the adjustable ones and for duty, (i.e. one load), adjustables are really not necessary.
Howdy StrawHat:

I too am a fan of fixed sighted N Frames.

Here's a pair of modified 1917's in .45 ACP (2nd Model Hand Ejector)...

S&W1917sWSchradeKnife_03.jpg

This one is a USBP Wolf & Klar Model of 1926 (3rd Model Hand Ejector)...

S&W1926USBP_01.jpg

A relatively modern version of the Model 21 (A purdy thing with case colored frame)...

S&WModel21_01.jpg

I agree with you about the fine looks of fixed sighted big frames, but the real world drawback is in speed of sight picture acquisition.......especially the earlier ones with the thin front sight.

Best Regards,

Geezer
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The more I get to handle my brother's M22-4, the more I like it. I have done a bit of searching and find references to the Thunder Ranch Model and a Turnbull finished Model. I do not find any references for a 22-3, 22-2 or any other iteration. Was there another fixed sighted revolver besides the 1917 that chambered the 45 ACP?
 

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Back in the day of drop pouches, reloading a revolver was a relatively slow process. I always thought the half moon clips for the 1917 was the answer for a sure and quick recharging a 6-shot revolver. Add the fact that the 45 ACP had a reputation as a better "man-stopper" than a 38 special. So StrawHat, I am agreed with you.
One other factor that may also play a part was the intimidation factor of a large revolver. I carried an N-frame 357 and I had a few handcuffed rear seat passengers ask me "is your gun a magnum?"



You would think that anyone looking at the business end of this revolver seeing those big hollowpoints in the cylinder, that they might be intimidated.
 

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The more I get to handle my brother's M22-4, the more I like it. I have done a bit of searching and find references to the Thunder Ranch Model and a Turnbull finished Model. I do not find any references for a 22-3, 22-2 or any other iteration. Was there another fixed sighted revolver besides the 1917 that chambered the 45 ACP?
YES there was the Model 22 in 1957, 22-1 in 1960, 22-2 in 1961. 1966 model 22 discontinued. I can't find a model 22-3. the info comes from standard cat of S&W second edition.
 
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