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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have come into some 115 copper plated RN. I usually load 125.
Can someone measure the oal of a factory load in 115 for me please?
Failing that the OAL you use for your 115 load with plated RN.

I have made up a batch and some pistols love it while some fail to feed. No stovepipes. I'll have to plunk test them i guess. I am close to max on powder so I don't think it's that.
These are loaded at 1.130. Oal.

Smiths, Glocks, CZ running fine. Beretta PX4 and Ruger SR9 not happy.

Thanks.
 

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I would think that your OAL is short enough. I loaded 124gr up to 1.150 in the past, but load what I have now at 1.135. I think a plunk test is the way to go to make sure you are OK there first. Another possibility is not quite enough crimp and maybe it is catching on the Ruger
 

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All ammo mentions is, of course, within the modern SAAMI specification.

I just loaded some 125gn FMJ with 4.8gn Hodgdon CFE Pistol powder, a new load for me. The Hodgdon manual indicated a 1.090 OAL. I loaded 100 of these, and shot 50 over the weekend. They ran flawlessly in my shooter Luger. It's a relatively soft shooting powder, which must be slower than my last go to poweders (Titegroup and BE-86).

The 115gn load for LRN lists the as OAL 1.100.
 
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All ammo mentions is, of course, within the modern SAAMI specification.

I just loaded some 125gn FMJ with 4.8gn Hodgdon CFE Pistol powder, a new load for me. The Hodgdon manual indicated a 1.090 OAL. I loaded 100 of these, and shot 50 over the weekend. They ran flawlessly in my shooter Luger. It's a relatively soft shooting powder, which must be slower than my last go to poweders (Titegroup and BE-86).

The 115gn load for LRN lists the as OAL 1.100.
CFE Pistol is slower burning than Titegroup, Unique, BE-865, and Power Pistol
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all. I am right in the middle on OAL and the same length with a different powder works in the fussy guns so maybe they don't like that powder. You wonder how the factory does it.
 

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Thanks all. I am right in the middle on OAL and the same length with a different powder works in the fussy guns so maybe they don't like that powder. You wonder how the factory does it.
There is no "guess" you need to plunk them, You also did not mention the powder??

Use the barrel of the gun and "plunk test" the finished rounds

You can not go by factory rounds unless you are using the exact same bullet. Sometimes just a "hair" shorter or longer makes a difference in some barrels. Your "crimp" Taper may also change things
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
N320 was the powder not giving good results. Power Pistol is working fine.
Raining today so i will take the guns down and plunk thrm all. I go very light on 9mm crimp so it may be that combined with sensitivity to burn rate and positioning with N320.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks rule3. Yes I have their data. I was wondering about length because I emailed Berry's (115 RN FMJ .356) and they suggested the 1.130 for their bullet, while the N320 sheets were suggesting 1.142. But the Berry's email was a general guide in the midrange in fairness.

CCI Small PIstol Primer
Fiocchi Brass
N320 4.2gr
Seated at 1.130
Slightly more than a light crimp from Lee crimp die.

As I said many of my 9mm love this load. I did a plunk test this aft and it was fine in the Beretta barrel.

Now take the same brass, primer, bullet and OAL and put 5.4gr of Power Pistol behind it and the Beretta PX$ Storm is happy as can be.

Thanks for your time. I really appreciate your expertise.
 

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COL (Cartridge Overall Length) varies with the bullet used. There is no single COL for a given bullet weight or for a given gun.
Per Ramshot:
"SPECIAL NOTE ON CARTRIDGE OVERALL LENGTH “COL”
It is important to note that the SAAMI “COL” values are for the firearms and ammunition manufacturers industry and must be seen as a guideline only.
The individual reloader is free to adjust this dimension to suit their particular firearm-component-weapon combination.
This parameter is determined by various dimensions such as
1) magazine length (space),
2) freebore-lead dimensions of the barrel,
3) ogive or profile of the projectile and
4) position of cannelure or crimp groove.

Always begin loading at the ‘Start Load.’"

Your COL (OAL) is determined by your barrel (chamber and throat dimensions) and your gun (feed ramp) and your magazine (COL that fits magazine and when the magazine lips release the round for feeding) and the PARTICULAR bullet you are using. What worked in a pressure barrel or the lab's gun or in my gun has very little to do with what will work best in your gun.
Take the barrel out of the gun. Create two inert dummy rounds (no powder or primer) at max COL and remove enough case mouth flare for rounds to chamber (you can achieve this by using a sized case—expand-and-flare it, and remove the flare just until the case "plunks" in the barrel).
Drop the inert rounds in and decrease the COL until they chamber completely. This will be your "max" effective COL. I prefer to have the case head flush with the barrel hood. After this, place the inert rounds in the magazine and be sure they fit the magazine and feed and chamber.
You can also do this for any chambering problems you have. Remove the barrel and drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth.
Remove and inspect the round:
1) scratches on bullet--COL is too long
2) scratches on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp
3) scratches just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case
4) scratches on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit
5) scratches on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster.
 

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This is for a 1911 45 ACP barrel but the method is the same for others. Don't use the image of headspace on the bullet. The correct headspace will be just like a sized EMPTY case dropped into the barrel. It spaces of the brass mouth

488767
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So - here's the range report and my conclusions. I took four firearms to the range and was blessed to have the facility to myself to shoot and take notes with each of four guns and four loads, plus some factory rounds. The guns were a Beretta PX4, a Ruger SR9, a Walther PPQ and a Sig 226.

All reloads were Berry's 115 grain, round nose, FMJ. All reloads were 1.132 OAL. Factory was American Eagle, 124.
Loads tried previously were run through the crimp again for a touch more in case that was the issue.

The SIG ate anything and everything, as had the Glock and CZ75 on the last testing. The PX4 was now happy with the previous load, so it appears that the crimp was the issue there, although adding .2gr to my load made it much happier.
The PPQ was not a fan of the N320 powder, but the exact same dimensions worked fine with Power Pistol, so that would seem to be a power/burn rate issue of some kind. The SR9 was happy with anything, except the weakest round, which stove piped a few times. Again the same recipe with .2gr up worked like a charm.

Short story - a little more crimp and a little more powder sorted out the issues. Thanks for all the input.
 
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