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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently picked up a 642 airframe as a back-up gun to my 9mm semi-autos.

I shoot very accurately with my PPQ, Shield 2.0 45 cal, and other semi-autos I've owned over the years; this is my first revolver purchase, although I've shot them occasionally over the years when friends had them.

Problem is, I can't get a handle on the 642. My groups are inconsistent. I'll shoot 2 or 3 with accuracy/tight then fire off a couple that are off the mark by 5 inches or more.

Any pointers, suggestions, or ideas? It's a snappy little gun, but I've shot much snappier guns with very good accuracy (semi-autos).

Thanks!
 

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It probably comes down to mastering that double action, 11 pound trigger pull. I have shot my airweights quite a bit. I was shooting one out to75 feet today and it boils down to trigger time. It doesnt take much movement as the trigger breaks to throw your shots around the target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think that must be it. The 11 lb. double action trigger is something I'm not used to, and yes, I'm probably making movements that aren't obviously perceptible to me. Yes, more trigger time, for sure! Probably more focus on my grip, etc. Thanks!
 

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I recently picked up a 642 airframe as a back-up gun to my 9mm semi-autos.

I shoot very accurately with my PPQ, Shield 2.0 45 cal, and other semi-autos I've owned over the years; this is my first revolver purchase, although I've shot them occasionally over the years when friends had them.

Problem is, I can't get a handle on the 642. My groups are inconsistent. I'll shoot 2 or 3 with accuracy/tight then fire off a couple that are off the mark by 5 inches or more.

Any pointers, suggestions, or ideas? It's a snappy little gun, but I've shot much snappier guns with very good accuracy (semi-autos).

Thanks!
Hello Harry Crews and welcome to the forum from N.E. Indiana!!! I have a Hogue grip on my 642, that way you get the little finger on the grip, I like it better for shooting over the stock grips!!
 

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I shoot my 642 pretty well, in the manner for which it was designed. I'd love to try to help Harry, so I'm gonna start by asking a question:
What size target are you shooting at, and from how far away ?
In full disclosure, I should add that I got my 642 in a trade from someone who could only BARELY pull the (factory) trigger. My initial experience with the little gun wasn't that bad...but I knew things could be better. I installed an aftermarket spring kit, used some hard Arkansas stones to "smooth everything up" internally, (without touching the sear nose btw). Good quality lube inside and the little gun does just fine when used in the manner for which it was designed...with a lot of practice rounds of course.
The fact is, when we make the choice to shoot a 642, we are compromising a few points vs. a semi-auto to get other advantages. Only you can decide which of those decision points outweighs the others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I shoot my 642 pretty well, in the manner for which it was designed. I'd love to try to help Harry, so I'm gonna start by asking a question:
What size target are you shooting at, and from how far away ?
In full disclosure, I should add that I got my 642 in a trade from someone who could only BARELY pull the (factory) trigger. My initial experience with the little gun wasn't that bad...but I knew things could be better. I installed an aftermarket spring kit, used some hard Arkansas stones to "smooth everything up" internally, (without touching the sear nose btw). Good quality lube inside and the little gun does just fine when used in the manner for which it was designed...with a lot of practice rounds of course.
The fact is, when we make the choice to shoot a 642, we are compromising a few points vs. a semi-auto to get other advantages. Only you can decide which of those decision points outweighs the others.
Thanks, Guido. I was shooting paper targets at 20 feet, 35 feet and 50 feet. Obviously better accuracy at shooter distances than longer. The trigger is indeed heavy. It doesn't bother in an obvious way, as I'm trying to adjust to it but it is very likely my lack of exp with such a heavy trigger w/ my ingrained (from semi-auto) grip, stance, trigger pressure, etc., is throwing off my accuracy.
 

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The other factor to keep in mind is how long you are taking to make a shot. My practice regimen with a carry gun always includes some shots that are carefully aimed, taking my time...to hit a 3" bull at various ranges from 5-20 yds.
That's never the bulk of my practice shooting however. The overwhelming majority of practice rounds with carry guns are fired QUICKLY at a BLANK piece of 11 x 17 in. copy paper. My goal is to put rounds on the target...BEFORE a bad guy can put rounds on ME. I work on two-hand shooting, one hand shooting and weak hand shooting. Majority of those rounds are fired at targets 10 yds or less.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Those are great little BUGs or carry guns.
 

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The quickest and cheapest solution is to forget pinpoint accuracy and just focus on five shots in three seconds at ten feet. Make the last one a head shot.

Might as well relax and be practical.

Along the path of practicality, why not use a micro 9mm for a backup?

Having two kinds of ammo is a complication that you don't really need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The other factor to keep in mind is how long you are taking to make a shot. My practice regimen with a carry gun always includes some shots that are carefully aimed, taking my time...to hit a 3" bull at various ranges from 5-20 yds.
That's never the bulk of my practice shooting however. The overwhelming majority of practice rounds with carry guns are fired QUICKLY at a BLANK piece of 11 x 17 in. copy paper. My goal is to put rounds on the target...BEFORE a bad guy can put rounds on ME. I work on two-hand shooting, one hand shooting and weak hand shooting. Majority of those rounds are fired at targets 10 yds or less.
Thanks for this. Yeah, I'm heading back to range tomorrow morning; will work on this again. Agree, both aimed shots and point-n-shoot training, both hands, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The quickest and cheapest solution is to forget pinpoint accuracy and just focus on five shots in three seconds at ten feet. Make the last one a head shot.

Might as well relax and be practical.

Along the path of practicality, why not use a micro 9mm for a backup?

Having two kinds of ammo is a complication that you don't really need.
Speaking of micros! My wife informed me over lunch that she stopped by the gun shop this morning and grabbed a Ruger LCP II as a "back-up/back-up"/pocket pistol. I've never shot one of those little bitty ones. I'll see what I'm in for, and I'm not sure why she bought it. I'll find out tonight when I get home.

Re: shooting - I like that. Focus on 5 shots in 3 secs at 10 feet, last a head shot. I'll do that tomorrow when I hit the range.
 

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I have one, and yes it is harder to shoot one well compared to semi-autos even of comparable size. I can do so with careful trigger control, shoot decent. I hadn't shot mine for two weeks before today and then shot it, and it felt like I was starting over. Wild fliers. Then, by the end, I was able to bring the accuracy in.
 

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The biggest problem with a J frame is that the handle is T I N Y. Horrible little thing. Way too small for my big hand. Hard to pull the trigger because it is so close/far back. Very difficult gun to shoot well.

Of course, bigger grips can be put on one, but that generally makes it no longer a pocket gun (and thus, eliminates its usefulness for me). I finally got some Taurus rubber grips that wrap around the backstrap. Like $15 on ebay. It requires careful redrilling of the locator pin holes in both sides, but they fit. And boy, what a difference it makes! Fills my hand a little bit better, makes it a little easier to pull the trigger, and less sting in the web of my hand. And no longer than "boot" grips, so still pocketable.

Worth a shot. ;)
 

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The biggest problem with a J frame is that the handle is T I N Y. Horrible little thing. Way too small for my big hand. Hard to pull the trigger because it is so close/far back. Very difficult gun to shoot well.

Of course, bigger grips can be put on one, but that generally makes it no longer a pocket gun (and thus, eliminates its usefulness for me). I finally got some Taurus rubber grips that wrap around the backstrap. Like $15 on ebay. It requires careful redrilling of the locator pin holes in both sides, but they fit. And boy, what a difference it makes! Fills my hand a little bit better, makes it a little easier to pull the trigger, and less sting in the web of my hand. And no longer than "boot" grips, so still pocketable.

Worth a shot. ;)
Thanks! I bought some hogue grips and need to put them on. However, they may be a bit bigger which impacts pocket carry.
 

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"The 11 lb. double action trigger is something I'm not used to, and yes, I'm probably making movements that aren't obviously perceptible to me."

Harry, dry fire at a dot on the wall, watching your sights as you pull the trigger and you will perceive the movement. Keep at it and your trigger finger will learn how pull through without disturbing the gun.
Try the first crease on the trigger, not the pad.
 

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I don't really carry this much anymore, even with the Taurus grip, which makes it much better to shoot (but still not super great). I can carry something bigger with no problem.

But the Taurus grip helps a fair bit. It fills up a little on the backstrap, so that it at least reaches the web of my hand (any other grip actually jumps back and hits my hand...hard). It is rubber, so it is tacky and will grip a pocket. But if you draw with your hand fully on the grip, it's not a big problem.
506302


The pocket holster I made many years ago. It is totally saturated with beeswax, so my sweat won't soak into, and through it. It helps.

Oh, and that is a Bodyguard hammer. It's less snaggy, and the high spur is easier for me to manipulate. Kinda looks like a J frame humpback hammer. ;)
 

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Here is how mine are set up. I can still pocket carry an draw pretty quick. The bigger grips distributes the recoil over more of the hand. The grips on the 442 are Thai grips from Ebay, the ones on the 638 are from my M60 Pro, and are made by Altamont. They give you sort of a RB to SB conversion which may naturally point better for some.
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