Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you think is necessary to do to a 629 that got very wet from a river splash? How far do I need to take it down and what should be stripped cleaned and lubed?

God Bless
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
Being stainless, I wouldn't panic. Splash, even a lot of it, probably isn't going to be bad. The stainless steel is going to save you from a heartache, but still you may need to take some steps now.
Enough spalsh to get in to the lockworks? You could remove the sideplate and let it air out, or maybe help it along with a blow dryer if you don't know how to disassemble the lockworks inside. Remove the grips/stocks, and the side plate screws (keep track of which screws come out of which holes), and then using a wooden mallet rap on the grip frame while keeping a hand under the sideplate to loosen it up. NEVER pry it off. Nothing inside is going to fly off across the room under spring pressure, just from sideplate removal. Do you know how to disassemble the cylinder? That too is a consideration.
The stocks, if wood, should be treated in a similar manner.
If the gun has been really soaked through and through, like no different than what would happen if it were dropped in water, then I would do a complete disassembly of the revolver to dry and clean/lube the gun. If you have some confidence and the right tools, we can walk you through much of what you need to do here.
 
G

·
Not to worry. Take the sideplate off and first spray the lockworks with WD-40, it is a water displacing formulation. Hose it down liberally. Then use a product like Gunscrubber to blow out the remaining WD-40. Drop of Rem oil on the trigger and hammer boss pins and put the side plate back together.

If you do not know how to properly remove the sideplate without damaging it, ask and we can address that for you. Just remember, use properly sized hollow ground screwdriver tips...and never pry anything. The best way is to vibrate it loose by lightly tapping on the gripframe after removing the stocks.

I shoot a Black Powder Ruger Old Army in Stainless and always strip it down and wash it out in very hot water ~ every time I take it shooting. After it dries it gets a light oiling and I'm done. Been doing it for years ;)

giz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry its taken me so long to respond, but I have not been able to login since 5 minutes after I created this thread but it has now been remedied.

I am used to dealing with wet guns that I can disassemble blind folded, but I am embarrassed to say I have never stripped a revolver :( I know, I know Skeeter Skelton would be so disappointed in me :-(

I managed to open it up and let it air out (only by the Grace of God b/c I did not have y'all's info) and the lock work was a bit overwhelming to my eyes. :? Some paddle shaped piece with a delta-esque shaped paddle with slots to allow it to slide the trigger bar into place popped out and I "think" I put it back correctly.

When it was wet I knew the firing pin hole had H2O in it and was worried about that and of course the innards that I am ignorant of...

I get this gun wet pretty often as it is my bear gun and it goes into the back country horse back and flyfishing. It seems to get splashed pretty good flyfishing on a regular basis, so I need to get more serious about its maintenance. I noticed the first (and only) rust on the hammer recently and really got worried for the innards.

I will take y'alls great advice, but is there a disassembly guide somewhere so I can get competent?

Thanks Big Time Guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
Look up in the FAQ thread, it will help you take it apart in the future.
As far as your ammo, I bet it will fire just fine.


I read once someone left cartridges in their pants pocket and it went thru the wash cycle. The ammo never new it and went bang every time. :mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks, but I can't find anything in FAQ gun related it seems to be all forum usage info...is there a FAQ some place else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
1) just put it in bucket of Alcohol or simply douse/soak it with the Alcohol.
2) you can buy Stainlss steel, steel wool to buff out scratches.
3) STAY AWAY FROM WD 40...YUCK....
4) I use a contractors lead pencil to graphite the face of the cylinder.

5) I am very carefull here: I have a gas stove and after using the gun is Wet, snowy Weather I have turned on the stove and held the Smith over the heat -hot pads- until the metal gets hot...the hot metal will evaporate the water under the side plate and any moisture which secretes into tight areas...

I've been a stainlss fan for nearly 35+ yrs; AND I don't buy a gun unless it is stainlss...

For an internal lubricant I use: Du Lite's/KWIKSEAL.
 
G

·
I kinda have to chuckle at this thread. I shoot alot of black powder guns including revolvers. The very best method of cleaning them is to take them down and wash them in soapy hot water. Very hot water! Hot enough to heat the steel and let it evaporate the water that is left on the surfaces. I then use modern WD-40 as a water displacing agent. The newer WD is not the same formulation as the earlier stuff. I use it liberally on all my BP guns. After that, I do a standard clean with my usual cleaning and lubricating supplies...

Moisture is much more of an issue with Black Powder then mordern Smokeless powders. It is hygroscopic and actually attracts moisture.

In my years of shooting BP revolvers, I've never had one even develope a spec of rust or a freckle....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,212 Posts
Don't forget to unload, before applying heat to it!!! :eek: :lol: Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I agree with Ralph.....WD-40 no more!
Years ago I got invited to a test using many items like WD-40.
The WD-40 was tested on many metals with rust developing later.
I do not use it on anything, stainless included
UCK-40 is a better name for it.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top