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Discussion Starter #1
I received this revolver from a family member that passed recently. All the information I could find on it was that it's an N-Frame, possibly model 3? Hand ejector and had the barrel/sight modified. The serial numbers also do not seem to match. I also think that it had been re-nickeled or wasn't nickeled to begin with because I don't think the trigger and hammer are supposed to be nickeled.

I'm just wondering if anyone here has any information on this gun or it's modifications. Was this done by a known gunsmith? Why was the barrel sawed off and sight replaced? What exact model would you call this gun, was I correct in my previous assumptions? (I believe the barrel was sawn off because the sight doesn't look to be original [I think it should be the half-moon] and the manufacture location seems to be cut off.

Thank you for reading and any help you can provide.

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Here's a complete album with more pictures: https://photos.app.goo.gl/PV1EjZxotQNxyWiX8
 

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It is a S&W Model of 1926 (3rd Model). The barrel has been shortened and appears to have a non factory nickel plated finish. I do not know what the S stands for but the 4306 is an assembly # which used at factory to keep the parts together.

Someone else will have more information and can tell you approximately when the pistol was manufactured.

Joe
 

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Welcome to the forum! What's the family history of the revolver? Great keepsake and one to pass on.:)
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! To clarify, your revolver is a S&W .44 Hand Ejector, 3rd Model, Post-war Transitional. It is also known as the Model 1926 or the Wolf and Klar model because they were the Dallas dealer who convinced S&W to make the .44 again with a shrouded ejector rod. For years after 1926, Wolf & Klar was the primary retailer of these guns. S&W didn't catalog them until 1940. Your gun is a transitional because after the war, S&W began to change its design from the pre-war style to the post-war look. We find these changes taking place over a period of years, thus a transition period where some guns exhibit new features while others made in the same time period do not.

The "S" is a part of the gun's serial number -- S63036. During WWII S&W used the "S" to identify which Victory revolvers had received a modification to their hammer block safety. When S&W resumed production of all its handguns, they incorporated the hammer block safety into most of them. And, they added the S prefix to the N frames and to the K frame M&P guns. Other models such as the K frame target guns also have the hammer block safety but a different alpha prefix.

Oh, the number on your grip panel is the number portion of the serial number of the gun it was shipped with. The grips are period correct for your gun but originally belonged to a much newer gun. If they were original, the stamp would be 63036. That style of grips was used from 1946 to 1953.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks so much for the info , just wanted to know. I don't know anything about the history. It was a very distant relation and passed years ago
 

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Hey Muddman. Gun would probably have little interest to collectors due to modifications but,,,,,,,,,,, would have a HUGE interest to those of us who own ,enjoy, and actually shoot the super COOL mutts of the world. Like the Rat Rods of the car world these hybrids have a charm of there own. Hey , guys convert Highway Patrolmans to make your gun,,,,, yup , that cool.
Why was it cut off ? Well , it comes from a time before these things were a revered thing on a pedestal . Folks made them into the tool THEY needed. I suspect at some point your relation needed a quite serious handgun.
I would not change a thing. I say get some rather ratty period leather and pack it around.
And think about the life and times of your relation every time you strap it on.
 

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Hey Muddman. Gun would probably have little interest to collectors due to modifications but,,,,,,,,,,, would have a HUGE interest to those of us who own ,enjoy, and actually shoot the super COOL mutts of the world. Like the Rat Rods of the car world these hybrids have a charm of there own. Hey , guys convert Highway Patrolmans to make your gun,,,,, yup , that cool.
Why was it cut off ? Well , it comes from a time before these things were a revered thing on a pedestal . Folks made them into the tool THEY needed. I suspect at some point your relation needed a quite serious handgun.
I would not change a thing. I say get some rather ratty period leather and pack it around.
And think about the life and times of your relation every time you strap it on.
Right On Al.........................!!!!
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! To clarify, your revolver is a S&W .44 Hand Ejector, 3rd Model, Post-war Transitional. It is also known as the Model 1926 or the Wolf and Klar model because they were the Dallas dealer who convinced S&W to make the .44 again with a shrouded ejector rod. For years after 1926, Wolf & Klar was the primary retailer of these guns. S&W didn't catalog them until 1940. Your gun is a transitional because after the war, S&W began to change its design from the pre-war style to the post-war look. We find these changes taking place over a period of years, thus a transition period where some guns exhibit new features while others made in the same time period do not.

The "S" is a part of the gun's serial number -- S63036. During WWII S&W used the "S" to identify which Victory revolvers had received a modification to their hammer block safety. When S&W resumed production of all its handguns, they incorporated the hammer block safety into most of them. And, they added the S prefix to the N frames and to the K frame M&P guns. Other models such as the K frame target guns also have the hammer block safety but a different alpha prefix.

Oh, the number on your grip panel is the number portion of the serial number of the gun it was shipped with. The grips are period correct for your gun but originally belonged to a much newer gun. If they were original, the stamp would be 63036. That style of grips was used from 1946 to 1953.
Dang, you related to Roy Jinks?:D

Great info!!
 
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