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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My pattern is to keep a loaded magazine in my 380 EZ, but not a bullet in the chamber. Then the gun will sit around for a month before I get back to the shooting range. What is the best method to keep this gun? Should I dry fire before loading the magazine which might wear the firing pin over time, or should I leave the gun charged up which it seems to me would wear out a spring or something!
 

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You're not going to hurt it dry firing but I'd leave the chamber loaded and keep it close.
 

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It's a choice whether you keep your defense handgun with a round in the chamber or not.

The key is that you should choose one mode or the other, and then train repeatedly in that mode at the range so that you learn to draw and shoot without consciously having to think through operation.

As mentioned, an attacker isn't going to give you time to rack the first round if the gun isn't completely loaded... In most altercations you are reacting to an assault without much if any warning.
 
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My pattern is to keep a loaded magazine in my 380 EZ, but not a bullet in the chamber. Then the gun will sit around for a month before I get back to the shooting range. What is the best method to keep this gun? Should I dry fire before loading the magazine which might wear the firing pin over time, or should I leave the gun charged up which it seems to me would wear out a spring or something!
Only time dry firing is detrimental to any firearm is with rimfire. Dry firing a centerfire has no impact on the weapons what so ever.
 

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Not sure what you are referring to. It seems that you are saying you are storing an empty gun and using it as a place to store a loaded magazine. Is that what you are saying?
Sure sounds like it. My suggestion to the op is, don't bother with trying to put it in battery, just throw it at the perp and run like hell....... :p
 

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RW - You ask an important question. Generally, a semi-auto without one in the chamber is considered an unloaded gun by people who study self defense. However, in many states, the presence of a magazine in the gun constitutes a loaded state regardless the absence of a chambered round. The law is not going to save your butt when you need your gun, so feel free to ignore the legal definition. Now, consider a revolver: When every one of those holes in the cylinder has a round in it, there is a round under the hammer ready to be fired. When you pick up that gun in the middle of the night to face an intruder in your bedroom, you do not want to have to rack a round into the chamber. You want to press that trigger quickly and make it go bang as soon as you can be on target.

Don't waste a minute about wearing out firing pins and magazine springs.

Welcome to the club.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My pattern is to keep a loaded magazine in my 380 EZ, but not a bullet in the chamber. Then the gun will sit around for a month before I get back to the shooting range. What is the best method to keep this gun? Should I dry fire before loading the magazine which might wear the firing pin over time, or should I leave the gun charged up which it seems to me would wear out a spring or something!
Many people seem offended that I don't keep a round in the chamber. It seems like many people think that the time to rack is detrimental to self defense. I want to point out something, from my personal experience. When the bad guy has a gun in your face, it does not matter if you have one in the chamber or not. Their gun was in my face, then they took my revolver, aimed it at me and pulled the trigger. In those days, I kept the first chamber of the revolver empty. That gave me the second to react and save my live.

The real key to safety is situational awareness. This means to know, seconds in advance, that danger is approaching and to get prepared. In this case, I have time to rack and I don't risk an accidental firing. Never let them get so close that you don't have the 1/2 second to pull and rack your firearm.

In my case, these days, no one can get into my house without making a lot of noise so I have time to pull and rack my gun. If the car behind me has made the last turn into my hood with me, then I don't stop at my house and I rack the gun. When out hiking, I listen for people and bears around the bend before I get there. When sitting at a restaurant my back is to the wall. So you see, to me there is no benefit to having a round in the chamber but it does increase the risk of an accidental firing.

My question is should I dry fire or leave it racked. The answer seems to be dry fire.
 

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In my opinion, any procedure that involves dry firing requires careful thought and extra safety procedures. I say this without any intention of disrespect, and do trust that everyone in this thread is careful and safety conscious. But any study of negligent discharges shows that many of them involve "unloaded" guns or dry fire.

My preferred procedure for dry fire is to clear the gun, then remove all ammunition from the dry firing area, and then check the gun again. It is intentional that I check the gun at least twice, but the more important part is that there is a consistent plan or ritual. I always do it the same way, and consistency avoids mistakes.

Consistency is particularly important for procedure that will be done regularly, and therefore will get done many times over the course of years.

In the OP's case, clearly the ammunition needs to be in the same area, so a different plan is required. Here are a few thoughts I have.
  • I would keep the magazine out of the gun when dry firing, so all ammunition is separated from the gun before the trigger is touched. Then I would insert the magazine after the hammer is dropped.
  • Some people always dry fire into a bulletproof backstop like a sand bucket, piece of body armor, or lengthwise into a shelf of heavy books. The goal here is not so much to stop a bullet, but to have a consistent procedure that keeps the mind focused.
  • I might just decide to leave the gun cocked, since I am not sure dry firing is necessary here. And just avoiding touching the trigger is a proven safety procedure.
  • The most important thing for the OP is not to follow my plans, but to make his own safe plan, and then do it consistently.
 

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I would not dry fire it if you are keeping the chamber empty because it defeats the purpose of the EZ. It makes it harder to rack the slide because you now have to cock the hammer. The EZ is a hammer fired pistol so when racking on a dry fired gun you are overcoming the recoil spring and the hammer spring. Also, that pistol has a grip safety. It will not fire unless that grip safety is fully depressed. Some also have a thumb safety as well. Much harder to have a negligent discharge with that pistol than many others.
 

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I would not dry fire it if you are keeping the chamber empty because it defeats the purpose of the EZ. It makes it harder to rack the slide because you now have to cock the hammer. The EZ is a hammer fired pistol so when racking on a dry fired gun you are overcoming the recoil spring and the hammer spring. Also, that pistol has a grip safety. It will not fire unless that grip safety is fully depressed. Some also have a thumb safety as well. Much harder to have a negligent discharge with that pistol than many others.
It is a little harder, but still quite a bit less effort than racking a regular M&P 2.0, so I wouldn't say it defeats the purpose.

In fact, until you posted this (and I did a comparison), I hadn't even noticed the increased effort.
 

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You are right it's not a lot harder but it is some. People that buy that pistol do so because they have difficulty running other pistols. Why make it harder. My wife has one. It's a nice shooting pistol but she has it because she could not run any of my other pistols, which are mostly Glocks and S&Ws. Bottom line it makes no sense to me to have a pistol like that with all of those safety features without a round in the chamber for carry or home defense. If that makes a person uncomfortable then more training is needed.
 
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