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It's a .38 M&P (Military and Police) model from the earlier part of the 1920's. They're excellent shooters.

Looks like the gun is pretty dry. I'd recommend that you get some spray gun oil like Breakfree CLP , remove the grips (loosen the screw and tap the frame to loosen- never pry the grips off), and thoroughly spray the gun inside and out.
Let drip dry and wipe down the exterior with a clean rag, then wipe out the bore and chambers with a patch.

A little maintenance and you'll get another 100 years out of it. :)
 

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From that serial number, it appears to be a M&P model of 1905, 4th change. Serial number range was 241704-1000000 and dates ran from 1915 to 1942
 

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From that serial number, it appears to be a M&P model of 1905, 4th change. Serial number range was 241704-1000000 and dates ran from 1915 to 1942
The grips and ejector rod knob narrow it down a good deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's a .38 M&P (Military and Police) model from the earlier part of the 1920's. They're excellent shooters.

Looks like the gun is pretty dry. I'd recommend that you get some spray gun oil like Breakfree CLP , remove the grips (loosen the screw and tap the frame to loosen- never pry the grips off), and thoroughly spray the gun inside and out.
Let drip dry and wipe down the exterior with a clean rag, then wipe out the bore and chambers with a patch.

A little maintenance and you'll get another 100 years out of it. :)
Thanks for the information and the advice!
 

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Another serial number? I know my dad's old NYPD revolver had a second serial number specific to the NYPD
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! I believe your Model 1905, square butt, AKA the .38 Military & Police revolver was shipped in late 1924 or early 1925 based on known shipping dates for nearby serial numbered M&Ps. The second serial number on the butt is likely a badge or rack number for an LEO or security organization. You might want to find out if your grandfather was an LEO since it could have been his duty gun. In your pictures, I see an empty holster. If the gun was being stored in that, that likely accounts for the rust on the barrel. Leather absorbs moisture and can cause blued guns to rust if they are left there for a long period of time. So, please soak that poor baby, without grips, in a bath of auto trans fluid and acetone for a week or so. Then wipe off the rust with a cloth. If it persists, you can take bronze wool or a copper chore boy scrub pad to it. Don't use steel wool or it will remove any remaining finish and scratch up the metal. Please store it in a sock or rug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you all for your help and advice.

My grandfather was in the Navy but never was a LEO. I've wondered if this could have been his service weapon but have always had the understanding that service weapons remained with the military after service. With a quick google search, it appears that it was possible to purchase your service weapon up until World War II however, I'm not sure how true that is.
 

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At the end of WWI a number of .45 caliber autos and revolvers were indeed sold to the service member. After WWII many .38 caliber were later surplused out but not to my knowledge in a direct sale on discharge. This gun is as stated from between the wars. Carrying personal weapons in combat zones has a history all over the map. Generally post Vietnam frowned on or forbidden but never say never. Even today.
 
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