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Discussion Starter #1
Been wanting to buy a Henry...in .357 to match my Model 60. Any experience or advise on this caliber in a rifle? Thanks.
 

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I really like my Marlin 1894 C in 357 Mag. It is really fun to shoot and the Williams Firesight / foolproof sight combo is really nice. Originally it had a big scope with high rings. That looked out of place so I took it off and put on the Williams Reciever sight. A while later I bought a firesight front sight.

 

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I don't know about the Henry rifles in 357, but I handled a .22 Henry and was appalled at the "chinsey" feel of it. The only lever 357 I would have is a Winchester 94ae or a Browning 92, or even one of the Rossi/Puma remakes of the Win 92 (have one in .45 LC and love it). Or a Marlin lever.
 

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My youngest daughter has a Marlin from her CAS days that's a dandy. I recently acquired a Rossi M/92 and put a Marbles tang sight on it. I got mine in a trade and was just keeping it for trading stock until I started to play with it. It's so darn handy and since hits hard enough for anything in my area, it's a keeper now.

I've used Marlin 44 mags for years, and my latest one sports a Leupold scout scope. I'm beginning to think that was a mistake, as it does not handle anywhere near as quickly as the 357 with the tang sight. I'll play with them both for a couple more years then decide.
 

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I have found that, (through personal experience :roll: ) mounting a scope on a lever action, is usually a mistake. It makes a handy and light rifle......sort of cumbersome. I did this with a nice Marlin 336, and ended up trading it off. The only advantage a scope or red dot offers, is if you have trouble seeing the iron sights. I eventually got a
Winchester 94, and put on a Williams FP. (I probably don't need it anyway, since it stays in the gun rack.)

The Winchester 94 is more of a collecter's item, and I like having it. The 94 has been a favorite rifle.....since I was a kid, staring at one in the Sears-Roebuck store, in the mid-50's. ;) Bob
 

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Bob K said:
I have found that, (through personal experience :roll: ) mounting a scope on a lever action, is usually a mistake. It makes a handy and light rifle......sort of cumbersome. I did this with a nice Marlin 336, and ended up trading it off. The only advantage a scope or red dot offers, is if you have trouble seeing the iron sights. I eventually got a
Winchester 94, and put on a Williams FP. (I probably don't need it anyway, since it stays in the gun rack.)

Bob
I agree that scopes on lever actions are generally a mistake. One exception I made is on my Marlin 444T, the old "Texan" model with the straight pistol grip stock made back in the 70s (in .444 of course), and I believe 24" barrel. That gun is just plain heavy and cumbersome to begin with, so when I bought it and it already had the scope on it, I left it on there. I can actually hit things with it at 200 yards! I don't think I could do that with a tang or peep sight.
 

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I had to finally put a scope on my marlin 45-70, getting old sucks. I'm at the point now that I can ether see my sights our the target, but not both at the same time. :cry:
 

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c pierce said:
I had to finally put a scope on my marlin 45-70, getting old sucks. I'm at the point now that I can ether see my sights our the target, but not both at the same time. :cry:
And, that's exactly why my 44 has a scope. I'm limited with the tang-sighted 357 to 100 yards and rather large targets, but it's fun.
 

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Another one with old eyes checkin' in. I love my Marlin .357 Magnum with scope. Too bad I'm not very consistent. I have another in .44 Mag without scope. Wanna guess which one I can hit the target with? If I squint and strain these old eyes I can usually make out the front sight bead. Usually.

Anywho, to answer the question, Keoki, go with a Marlin. .357 is fun, but a .44 is funner.
 

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If I actually used my Win. 94 for deer hunting, (I have to use a shotgun. :roll: ) I think that the Williams FP receiver, combined with a Firesight front sight, is the right set-up for old eyes. If I had a Marlin, I'd be tempted to put on a Bushnell Trophy Red Dot. Bob
 

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I put a Skinner peep sight on my 1894. It's a really simple set up with removable aperture. I've got a couple different sizes of apertures to go in it, but anymore I find that just using the ghost ring works pretty well by itself.

Here's a pic to give y'all an idea. The knurled part comes out leaving a nice ghost ring. I found out about this set up when I was a member of the Marlin forum a couple years ago. I've been very pleased with it.

 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for your replies and pictures. A great help for me. I'm going to keep the Model 60 by the bed. I got a Marlin 1894 in stainless .44 mag. Had to get a Super Blackhawk in .44 mag to justify the rifle and all the reloading stuff I now have on order. Needless to say I am VERY HAPPY for an old grouch.
Thanks again.
 

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(Oops, I replied after only looking at the first page of this thread. I missed that you bought a Marlin .44! Good for you, you'll enjoy it!)

Keoki:

A lever gun in .357 is alot of fun in a lightweight rifle. It packs plenty of punch in .357 but it fires less expensive .38's just as well. A .44 Magnum can't save you money with .44 Special factory ammo, it's virtually just as expensive as the Magnum loads. For this reason alone, I think you're right on track with the .357 cartridge.

As to the Henry, I believe another poster probably picked up the cheap blued version which is light and doesn't have much "feel" to it. However, I have the .17 caliber Goldenboy and I love it. The action is butter smooth and light. It groups shots in a quarter at 100 yards. The fit and finish of the wood to blued steel to brass is top quality. The Henry Goldenboy in .357 is a robust and handy rifle that certainly doesn't feel chintzy in my hands (I've handled them but never shot them). If you like the style of the brass receiver and the fact that the Henry is made in the USA by Americans with all American steel, brass, and walnut, it's a great gun for the money.



The problem with the Winchesters are that they don't make the Model 92 anymore with the short pistol action. They make the Model 94 which is a long action and it is modified to take the pistol .357 cartridge. My good friend has one and it shoots great when he doesn't short stroke the action. When he does (which he does often when competing in Cowboy Action Shooting), he works the lever, ejects the empty case, cocks the hammer, but it doesn't put a live round in the chamber. He thinks everything is okay until he pulls the trigger and the Winchester goes click instead of bang.

A Winchester replica Model 92 in .357 would probably be great but I have no experience with them.

You can't go wrong with the Marlin 1894 in .357 Magnum. The first gun I ever bought was one of these. Here it is:



I love my Marlin. Again, made in the USA with a long and storied history. If you can find a used one without the crossbolt safety, that would be even better.

Good luck!
 
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